Sinews of War, The Logistical Battle to Keep the 53rd Welsh Division On the Move During Operation Overlord

This important book is packed with information. The author has provided a rare account of logistics in supporting a combat operation that will be of enormous value to historians and enthusiasts – Highly Recommended.


http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Sinews of War, The Logistical Battle to Keep the 53rd Welsh 
Division On the Move During Operation Overlord
FILE: R2596
AUTHOR: Major A D Bolland MBE
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  101
PRICE: £9.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, World War II, World War 2, Operation 
Overlord, Normandy landings, breakout, armoured formations, logistics, 
resupply, ammunitioning, fuel, food, equipment

ISBN: 1-47386-856-4

IMAGE: B2596.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ydy7akbh
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This important book is packed with information. The 
author has provided a rare account of logistics in supporting a 
combat operation that will be of enormous value to historians and 
enthusiasts – Highly Recommended.

In a vast mountain of military history books the very rare books 
look at logistics, even though no army could take the field without 
logistics, where those that suffer interruption of logistics are 
either besieged or retreats.

Before the mechanization of armies, almost every army took its 
baggage train with it. This train included supply wagons, pack 
animals and camp followers. As battle was about to be joined, the 
baggage train would be sent to the rear. After the battle the 
victorious army brought forward its baggage train. Mechanization 
introduced many changes. Fast moving armoured/mechanized forces had 
to be supplied in the field. The major requirement was fuel, but the 
rapid firing guns that are a feature of this type of force also 
required ammunition to be supplied frequently. This meant that the 
logistics system had to anticipate where the forward units would be 
when they required resupply. In the fluid warfare of desert fighting, 
the logistics vehicles are unlikely to follow on behind but strike 
out on an intercepting course to rendezvous at some point ahead. 
Even in the close confines of a European battlefield, logistics has 
to anticipate. If the anticipation, and the radio calls from forward 
units, do not succeed in linking the battle groups with their supply 
vehicles in time, the fighting vehicles run out of fuel and become 
useless. They also become vulnerable to the enemy, particularly if 
their tactical air force does not hold air superiority, as applied to 
the German last ditch counter attack through the Ardennes. In North 
Africa, both sides out ran their logistics, were forced to halt and 
then sent into retreat.

The Normandy landings were potentially out matched by the defenders 
and any failure in the flow of logistics could prove fatal. 
Considerable effort went into preparing the logistics. This included 
sections for two artificial harbours being floated across the Chanel 
and joined together while the troops were trying to fight their way 
off the beaches. As the harbours were being assembled, amphibious 
trucks came ashore with the first resupplies, and an underwater 
pipeline was brought ashore to provide fuel to the vehicles  
carrying it forward to refuel the fighting vehicles. It was an 
incredible feat of engineering but it has never received the 
attention it deserves from historians. However, it was just a 
starting point. Logistics then had to be carried forward behind the 
advancing battle groups and this is almost invisible in histories. 
Of course it doesn't have the excitement of battle and attention is 
focussed on the battle groups that were only able to function with 
effective logistics.

The author has written a remarkable presentation of how the 53rd 
Welsh Division was kept supplied on the move during Operation 
Overlord. The fact-filled work will be invaluable to historians and 
military students, but it should be widely read by all those with 
an interest in WWII and mechanized units that have followed. It 
provides a graphic view of the challenges that have to be overcome to 
keep the fighting vehicles moving forward to their objectives.

The author has produced concise and descriptive text that is 
supported by many illustrations in the form of sketches, maps and 
photographs, with many very informative tables. Originally privately 
produced for Rhine Army, this edition takes a vital part of battle 
planning and objectives achievement to a wide audience.

This work is much more significant that just a history of keeping 
the 53rd Welsh Division moving. It shows how all mechanized 
formations have to be supplied in any modern army.