Siege Warfare During the Hundred Years War, Once More unto the Breach

This is a very readable and well-illustrated review of siege warfare during the late Middle Ages. This book is essential reading for anyone with an interest in the Middle Ages and the battles and sieges of the Hundred Years War between France and England – Most Recommended

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NAME: Siege Warfare During the Hundred Years War, Once More unto the Breach
FILE: R2751
AUTHOR: Peter Hoskins
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword 
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 234
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Middle Ages, European warfare, Medieval Period, castles, city walls, f
ixed defences, 100 Years War, Hundred Years War, France, England, knights, 
engineers, men-at-arms, civil population, breaching walls

ISBN: 1-47383-432-5

IMAGE: B2751.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yagxfb52
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  This is a very readable and well-illustrated review of siege 
warfare during the late Middle Ages.  This book is essential reading for anyone 
with an interest in the Middle Ages and the battles and sieges of the Hundred 
Years War between France and England -  Most Recommended

By the late Middle Ages, the castle and the walled town had reached the apex of 
their development. To win victory, an army had to do more than defeat the enemy 
army. The wealth of a nation and its political force was located conveniently in the 
towns and at castles commanding strategic points. Built to protect defenders, these 
fixed fortifications usually became traps for their occupants. From simple hill forts, 
they had developed complex technology to destroy enemy troops as they fought 
through the defensive layers. However, the critical weakness, that still applies to 
fixed defences, is that the defenders have a finite supply of food and water. An 
attacker who was not impatient could simply surround a castle or walled city and 
wait until starvation, thirst, and sickness had reduced the defenders to the point 
where it was more attractive to throw themselves on the mercy of the attackers 
rather than suffer any longer.

Attackers usually preferred not to wait for the inevitable end and they employed a 
variety of techniques and technologies to speed the surrender of the besieged 
location. Walls were undermined and siege artillery hurled projectiles into the 
target, including the use of biological weapons in the form of diseased animal and 
human bodies. Fire was a frequent weapon and siege towers were built to deliver 
shock troops to the target over the fortified walls.

The author has describe compellingly the processes, the motives, the techniques and 
the technologies, including the early use of gunpowder, to deliver stone and metal 
shot to the enemy walls to create breaches through which the attackers would gain 
entry to the town or castle. Good insight into the strategy and tactics employed and 
graphic accounts of key sieges. Essential reading for all those with an interest in 
Medieval history, the protracted Anglo-French conflict, and the art of siege warfare. 
The information is also applicable to those interested in other periods and wars 
because it brings to a climax the warfare developed in ancient history and holds 
lessons for any fixed defences employed since Medieval times.