Send More Shrouds, The V1 Attack on the Guards’ Chapel 1944

Grateful for the sub-title that makes clear this has nothing to do with shroud waving Comrade Corbyn cynically jumping on any passing bandwagon. At the point of the war where the Allies could scent victory over Germany, the V1 began arriving over London. This is a graphic account of the most deadly V1 attack of WWII. Aerial bombing is never a pretty sight, but the use of crude unmanned flying bombs removes all pretence of deliberately targeting military sites. – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Send More Shrouds, The V1 Attack on the Guards' Chapel 1944
FILE: R2568
AUTHOR: Jan Gore
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  188
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War II, Second World War, 1944, 
V1, Vengeance Weapons, flying bomb, doddle bug, UAV, drone, ramjet, 
gyroscope, 

ISBN: 1-47385-147-5

IMAGE: B2568gjpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yay2rxg7
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Grateful for the sub-title that makes clear this has 
nothing to do with shroud waving Comrade Corbyn cynically jumping on 
any passing bandwagon. At the point of the war where the Allies could 
scent victory over Germany, the V1 began arriving over London. This 
is a graphic account of the most deadly V1 attack of WWII. Aerial 
bombing is never a pretty sight, but the use of crude unmanned 
flying bombs removes all pretence of deliberately targeting military 
sites.  -  Highly Recommended.

The V1 was a weapon of mass desperation. There is much debate about 
the ethics of targeting towns with aerial bombing and the prospect 
of massive civilian casualties. This is in many respects a question 
of virtue signalling and hypocrisy. Through history, armies have 
taken and sacked villages and towns with absolutely no regard for 
civilians. An enemy is an enemy, to the victor the spoils. It is myth 
that warfare is chivalrous and ethical where warriors only attack 
other warriors, respecting the sick, the old and the young, the women 
and children. What the two world wars did was introduce the ability 
to cause mass death from a relatively safe distance and require women 
to fill the void, left by men joining the military, to keep 
production going for civil and military consumption.

When the Germans carried out air raids on the British Isles during 
WWI, and used their cruisers to bombard coastal towns, it was 
deliberately intended to cause terror and break the British will. 
British air raids were targeted in the main on airship sheds and 
naval ports. That did not protect civilians living close to these 
targets because bombing techniques were primitive. Germany then went 
on during the Spanish Civil War to polish their ability to mount 
terror raids. Towns holding against the Nazi-backed Franco were 
deliberately laid waste as an example. It was therefore no great 
surprise when the Germans again used area bombing against British 
towns and deliberately targeted some of the most beautiful Medieval 
towns for no better reason than they featured in a German guide book 
for tourists as places of great interest and beauty. The RAF and 
USAAF did make some attempt to limit collateral damage although it 
can be argued this was because they wanted to cause maximum damage 
to military assets and war production where every bomb striking a 
home or a hospital was a less productive bomb. The V1 and V2 were 
deliberately designed as vengeance weapons and the greater the 
casualty rate the better, particularly civilian casualties.

The first weapon to enter service was the V1. It was a relatively 
simple device. A small unmanned aeroplane, it was powered by a cheap 
ramjet and had a very crude guidance system. Fired from a catapult, 
it flew straight and level towards the British coast at relatively 
low altitude and at a similar speed to the best piston engine 
fighters serving the RAF. The gyro controlled guidance just kept 
the flight path straight and the altitude constant. When the fuel 
was used, the V1 was put into a dive and hit whatever was 
unfortunate enough to be below it. Targeting was therefore very 
crude and comprised the fuel load and the direction the catapult 
pointed in. The Germans hoped to receive information on where the 
V1s fell to refine the crude targeting methods. As the agents 
inserted by Germany had either been turned of eliminated, German 
intelligence received damage reports that the British wanted to 
send then with the purpose of getting the Germans to point their 
V1s away from profitable targets.

The RAF soon discovered that the V1 was potentially very vulnerable. 
A box barrage from anti-aircraft guns moved out of the towns to the 
Chanel Coast could destroy a large number of V1s because they were 
flying in a straight line at a fixed altitude and speed. The best 
piston engine fighters and the first Meteor jet fighters could also 
be used to destroy V1s. As small aircraft, the cruise missiles could 
be caught and shot down, but their gyroscopes coil be toppled by 
flying along side and tipping the V1 by bringing a wing up under 
the missile's wing. As a result, the V1 scourge was less than at 
first feared but that was no consolation for those blown up by the 
relatively small number that made it through the defences or fell 
onto populated areas after being hit by AAA or fighter aircraft, or 
crashed deliberately when their fuel was all used up.

The author has told the story of one V1 that found a target to 
devastating effect and placed that incident in the context of the 
bombing campaign on London. There is good illustration in the form 
of a photo-plate section.