Secret Service in the Cold War, an SIS Officer From Philby to the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Balkans

Authoritative accounts of the intelligence world through the Cold War are very rare, making this autobiographical account all the more important and valuable. The author, together with his son’s efforts to edit and present the story, has provided a senior insider’s account of a part of history shrouded in darkness. – Strongly Recommended

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NAME: Secret Service in the Cold War, an SIS Officer From Philby to the Cuban 
Missile Crisis and the Balkans
FILE: R2808
AUTHOR: LT Col John B Sanderson, Myles Sanderson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 429
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, World War 2, Second World War, Cold War, 
intelligence services, SIGINT, HUMINT, SIS, MI4, MI5, MI6, Balkans War, traitors, 
Philby, Cuban Missile Crisis, Glasnost, Regan, Kennedy, Khrushchev, Thatcher, 
Gorbachev

ISBN: 1-52674-090-7

IMAGE: B2808.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y4vx58rm
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   Authoritative accounts of the intelligence world through the 
Cold War are very rare, making this autobiographical account all the more 
important and valuable. The author, together with his son's efforts to edit and 
present the story, has provided a senior insider's account of a part of history 
shrouded in darkness. -  Strongly Recommended

Lt Col Sanderson was a soldier, intelligence officer and diplomat. His Intelligence service covers the 
span of the Cold War and the aftermath with the Balkans War and the restructuring of Europe. This is 
a part of history that is still shrouded in myth and mystery. Of information already released, in fiction 
and non-fiction, more than half is probably deliberate misdirection and misinformation. Myles 
Sanderson has pulled together material left by his father and added in his own research, producing 
what is as much an autobiography as a biography. Much of the history is still highly sensitive, 
accounting for the lack of authoritative accounts. We are probably still at least fifty years away from 
significant declassification of documents to enable a fund of history books to become possible.

This book lifts a corner of the history. Lt Col Sanderson lived and worked through all of the major 
events from the end of WWII, through the Berlin Airlift, Korean War, Suez, Cuban Missile Crisis to 
the collapse of the Soviet Union and consequential upheaval in Eastern and Central Europe and the 
Balkans. That process is still incomplete.

During the period, Sanderson was responsible for the creation of networks inside the Soviet Union, 
their betrayal by Philby and the Cambridge spies, the turning of KGB and GRU intelligence officers 
and the impact of the defections of Penkovsky and Gordievsky. This is a gripping story that is 
supported by two photo-plate sections with some very rare images.