Secret Naval Investigator, The Battle Against Hitler’s Secret Underwater Weapons

The author died in 1989, aged 90, but fortunately he took the time to write this enthralling account of one of the least told important stories of WWII. The Royal Navy attracted a wide range of very different individuals to the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve in the months before the outbreak of WWII. The author was a barrister who became a specialist in investigating German underwater weapons and neutralizing them – Very Highly Recommended.


http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

 

NAME: Secret Naval Investigator, The Battle Against Hitler's Secret 
Underwater Weapons
FILE: R2530
AUTHOR: Commander F Ashe Lincoln QC RNVR
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Frontline
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  182
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, World War 2, Second World War, 
underwater weapons, bomb disposal, mine disposal, intelligence, 
technology, counter measures

ISBN: 978-1-52670-119-0

IMAGE: B2530.jpg6
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/lzsh7bp
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The author died in 1989, aged 90, but fortunately he 
took the time to write this enthralling account of one of the least 
told important stories of WWII. The Royal Navy attracted a wide 
range of very different individuals to the Royal Naval Volunteer 
Reserve in the months before the outbreak of WWII. The author was 
a barrister who became a specialist in investigating German 
underwater weapons and neutralizing them – Very Highly Recommended.

The work of bomb disposal specialists from the RN, Army and RAF has 
received very little attention, even though they played a critical 
role during WWII and, although they may not have won the war, they 
certainly avoided defeat. Their existence was a deadly cat and mouse 
game with German designers developing bombs and mines. An important 
part of each weapon design was technology deliberately intended to 
kill bomb disposal personnel. That is a fair indication of just how 
important these heroes were, that the enemy should spend so much 
effort to kill them.

To many, the assumption is that a bomb or a mine should explode when 
dropped or come into contact with a ship. In reality, the challenges 
facing a weapons designer are infinitely more complex. If a bomb 
explodes at first contact, it may fail to do maximum damage to the 
target. When aimed at a land target, the bomb that penetrates before 
exploding causes maximum damage. By introducing a delay system, the 
designer can also aim to kill people who would have been taking 
shelter at the time the bomb was dropped. As the air raid defence 
forces have no idea which bombs are duds and which are either quietly 
counting down to detonation, or waiting for their bobby traps to set 
them off and kill bomb disposal personnel, large areas may have to be 
left vacant until a very careful research has accounted for all bombs 
dropped and ensured that they no longer present a threat.

Similarly, sea mines have two basic tasks. One is to sink ships, but 
as important is the mine that closes a shipping route until it has 
been located and neutralized. In most conflicts, the unexploded 
device can present a greater problem by just sitting there and 
denying freedom of access to the enemy.

Disposing of ordinance requires a very special person. It is a nerve-
racking job where the disposer can be blown apart at any moment, 
calling for a very special form of courage. Neutralizing the device 
is important but it is also very important to identify each new 
weapon, how it works, what it is capable of, how to safely dispose of 
it and how to develop counter measures. In the case of the magnetic 
mine, it was initially a mystery. Ships were being damaged and sunk 
by devices that were unknown. They did not float awaiting a target, 
therefore being vulnerable to minesweepers that could cut their 
mooring tethers and explode them when they surfaced. This was an 
unknown weapon that appeared in swept areas and did not require 
direct contact with the target.

The author provides a vivid account of his activities during WWII and 
for many readers this will all be fresh news. There just has not been 
before an account of this type about such a dangerous and vital job 
during WWII. Of particular note is the discussion of the work to 
counter magnetic mines and acoustic torpedoes.