Secret Duties of a Signals Interceptor, Working With Bletchley Park, The SDS and the OSS

Had this book only covered the Special Duties Service and its radio intercept stations, it would be a very important addition to the available knowledge on one of the most important but covert parts of activity during WWII. The author has covered much more including details of RAF Mosquito squadrons and her later service for the OSS. Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Secret Duties of a Signals Interceptor, Working With Bletchley 
Park, The SDS and the OSS
FILE: R2440
AUTHOR:  Jenny Nater
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  207
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, American 
volunteers, SDS, RAF, SOE, Station Y, Station X, radio intercepts, 
SIGINT, Bletchley Park
ISBN: 1-47388-712-7
IMAGE: B2440.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/zpfogj2
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Had this book only covered the Special Duties Service 
and its radio intercept stations, it would be a very important 
addition to the available knowledge on one of the most important but 
covert parts of activity during WWII. The author has covered much 
more including details of RAF Mosquito squadrons and her later 
service for the OSS. Most Highly Recommended. 

The author began her war service as a bilingual wireless operator in 
the most secret SDS at Dover. Her job was to intercept traffic from 
German warships in the English Channel and report this to Bletchley 
Park. This work was vital but has received very little coverage 
before. The code breaking work at Bletchley Park has dominated 
coverage since the secrets began to be published during the last 
twenty years. Of course there was so much of enormous importance and 
fascination in the Bletchley story, not least that it led Britain to 
build the first electronic computers and begin the information 
revolution that now dominates life around the world. In the process, 
SIGINT may seem rather less glamorous at the critical intercept point. 
However, without signal interception there would have been no code to 
break at Bletchley and even before the codes were broken, the source 
and volume of wireless traffic could provide some very important 
information. In WWI the RN wireless intercept stations warned of the 
German Fleet preparing to sail and resulted in the Battle of Jutland 
which may have been costly to the RN warships, but ensured that the 
Germans ran for their home port and stayed there safely to the end of 
the war.

The author struck up several friendships, including a young man who was 
lost off Dover in tragic circumstances. Young men and women formed these 
relationships as an important part of their lives as they were they were 
thrown together far from home. Later, the author was to meet her husband 
in this manner.

When the US entered the war, volunteers who had already been fighting for 
Britain were encouraged to move to the US forces. The author moved to OSS 
and met her husband who had been flying Mosquito missions over Occupied 
Europe. This aerial experience has been included in the book and adds 
several valuable insights.

The book is a trilling and poignant story that opens up a secret world in 
a new way. There is also a very interesting photo-plate section that adds 
much to an already enthralling story.