Rome Rules The Waves, a Naval Staff Appreciation of Ancient Rome’s Maritime Strategy 300 BCE – 500 CE

This unique history of Roman naval power is a must read for everyone who has an interest in Ancient History. The author has provided a most comprehensive review of centuries of Roman naval activity and its critical part in the expansion of Rome’s influence and power. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Rome Rules The Waves, a Naval Staff Appreciation of Ancient Rome's 
Maritime Strategy 300 BCE – 500 CE
FILE: R3126
AUTHOR: James J Bloom
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword 
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Ancient Rome, Roman Republic, Roman Empire, soldiers at sea, naval 
warfare, trade routes, sea lanes, galleys, sailing ships, merchant ships, invasion, naval 
supremacy

ISBN: 1-78159-024-9

PAGES: 288
IMAGE: B3126.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ssz7pco
DESCRIPTION: This unique history of Roman naval power is a must read for 
everyone who has an interest in Ancient History. The author has provided a most 
comprehensive review of centuries of Roman naval activity and its critical part 
in the expansion of Rome's influence and power. – Most Highly Recommended.

The history of Roman naval supremacy has some interesting parallels with British 
naval supremacy during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. Where most, 
incorrectly, believe that Royal Navy actions ended with the comprehensive defeat of 
the Spanish and French Fleets in 1805 at the Battle of Trafalgar, the war at sea 
continued  and developed into the Dash For Empire. Similarly, most assume that 
Roman naval activity ended with the defeat of Anthony and Cleopatra's fleet at 
Actium in 31 BC. The author convincingly puts the record straight.

Illustration is confined to the opening pages, providing a sketch of a typical Roman 
merchant ship, silhouettes of warships from the period covered, and a set of 
informative maps showing routes and naval battles. The clear and readable text is set 
into a series of sections dealing with the important naval actions of the period and 
concludes with a view of naval operations and the attacks of the Vandals in the 5th 
Century AD. In the process, the author provides the background to operations and the 
development of strategy and tactics across the period covered.

This a book that will appeal to and serve both professionals and enthusiasts, together 
with those who are curious about the largely unknown part of Roman history.