Roman Conquests, The Danube Frontier

A nicely presented review of Roman attempts to expand across the Danube. The soundly researched text is supported by clear maps and a very interesting photo-plate section – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Roman Conquests, The Danube Frontier
FILE: R2956
AUTHOR: Michael Schmitz
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Roman Legions, cavalry, bridging equipment, fixed fortification, weapons,
armour, tactics, strategy, Pannonia, Moesia, Thrace, Dacians, Danube, natural barriers

ISBN: 1-84884-824-2

IMAGE: B2956.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y23r2gcr
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: A nicely presented review of Roman attempts to expand across the 
Danube. The soundly researched text is supported by clear maps and a very 
interesting photo-plate section –   Highly Recommended.

The author presents an account with review of strategy and tactics. It fits very neatly 
into other books from the same publisher covering events before and after the period 
covered in this new book.

There will always be debate about how far the Roman expansion was deliberate, 
based on a carefully prepared strategic plan, and how far it was reactive to opponents 
outside the borders of the Roman Empire. All empires flourish as they expand but, 
once they stop expanding, it is not long before they start to collapse. Neighbouring 
enemies learn of the Empire's vulnerabilities and the administration of the Empire 
will eventually outrun its ability to communicate and enforce.

In the early years of the Second Century, the Roman Legions were still winning 
battles but experiencing great difficulty in expanding north of the Danube and 
Macedonia and failing to overcome continued Germanic resistance, with raids into 
Roman held territory becoming more numerous and successful. Even in Britain 
raids from across the North Sea were increasing. Between then and the late 4th  
Century, when Western Rome fell and the Empire survived only in the Eastern 
Empire based on Constantinople, the Roman military steadily lost the initiative. 
During the period they tried emulating their enemies and their equipment as they 
were forced to rethink tactics. The days of set piece battles against opponents who 
used similar weapons and tactics were being replaced by mobile warfare with cavalry 
and mounted infantry making raids on Roman positions and formations.

This book is specially interesting because in the process of reviewing the events along 
the Danube, it shows how the Romans were trying to adapt to new foes in unfamiliar 
climate and terrain as the number of victories began to reduce and the fortunes of 
Rome moved into the period of contraction.