Revolt at Taos, The New Mexican and Indian Insurrection of 1847

The author has an impressive list of titles that deal with important 
periods in US history. This book provides a study of one of the key 
stages of US expansion in North America. Strongly Recommended.

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NAME: Revolt at Taos, The New Mexican and Indian Insurrection of 1847
FILE: R2388
AUTHOR:  James A Crutchfield
PUBLISHER: Westholme Publishing, Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  229
PRICE: US$29.95
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: US territorial expansion, new territories, Mexico, native 
Americans, Hispanics, Charles Bent, forts, volunteer US troops, 
regular US troops, President Polk
ISBN: 1-78384-559-9
IMAGE: B2388.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/gmk2n62
LINKS: Current Discount Offers http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/sale 
DESCRIPTION: The author has an impressive list of titles that deal 
with important periods in US history. This book provides a study of 
one of the key stages of US expansion in North America. 
Strongly Recommended.

When the British began establishing colonies in North America, other 
European countries had already been there for some time and much of 
North America was home to the native Americans who had arrived far 
earlier, across the land bridge that once linked America and Asia. 
As a result, the early settlers had to not only establish their towns 
and communities in hostile lands, but they had to fight communities 
that had already been established, blocking their expansion.

The huge spaces of what became Canada included a strong French 
occupation in Quebec. Although any of the factions that formed Canada 
may from time to time make different claims, Canada was able to 
establish a working relationship that did not submerge French or 
native cultures. This new country also acted as a refuge for native 
Americans fleeing genocide in the US. There will be many views as to 
why Canada followed a different path from that taken by the British 
colonists further South, but there was no desire to break from the 
rapidly expanding British Empire, a distrust of the British colonists 
to the South and their use of slaves, a community that relied on 
trapping and agriculture, and a remarkable level of tolerance of 
others. In a great many ways, Canada was what colonial expansion should 
be, including the early change from colony to Dominion. The United 
States could be argued, from the same perspective, as everything 
colonization should not be

Further South, British colonists had frequent differences with rule 
from London. This was largely based on economic greed and there were 
frequent examples of colonists crying out for military support from 
British troops against natives and colonists of other nationalities, 
coupled with a strong desire not to pay anything towards the cost of 
this support. Inevitably it led to civil war and US independence.

The newly independent US suddenly had to fight to protect itself and 
fight to expand West. This in turn meant that a series of wars would 
be fought against established colonies of other nations and against 
the native Americans who had enjoyed freedom to roam the vast spaces 
of the American Continent for millennia.

The pattern soon became well established. First, trappers and farmers 
migrated into neighbouring areas. Then they tried to form new American 
Territories. Finally they became new States that joined the United 
States of America. In the first stage the new settlers often received 
acceptance of whoever already occupied the land. After all, the spaces 
were enormous and a few settlers or hunters made little impact on 
whoever had arrived before them. The problems really began as the first 
settlers were joined by an increasing stream of new settlers who had 
heard the areas were attractive places to settle and exploit. The 
original population came to experience the great disadvantages of a 
greedy occupation and a desire to live by different laws.

New Mexico was fairly typical of this form of expansion. In French areas 
and Russian colonies, the USA offered to buy the parent nations out, but 
in New Mexico and Texas this was considered unnecessary, with Spain no 
longer a world power in control of its colonies. Moving in more 
immigrants and establishing a US culture was a more attractive approach 
for the US Federal Government. As the settlements increased in number and 
size, forts were built, governors were appointed, while volunteer and 
regular US troops were sent to enforce the new rule.

In Taos, the Hispanics and native Americans suffered increasing friction 
and inevitably they began to fight back. In doing this, they provided a 
level of excuse for the US to send increasing numbers of troops into the 
territory and to establish a legal system that then began to arrest 
dissenters and put them on trial, jailing or executing them.

The author has presented a well-researched study of the revolt at Taos 
which had previously been air-brushed from American history. It makes 
interesting reading although many Americans might consider it 
'un-American', or at least unwelcome, in opening a view into the darker 
side of the creation of a powerful nation in a very short period of 
time.