Revised Anniversary Edition, 3 Para Mount Longdon, The Bloodiest Battle

Like many a fascist state before them the Argentine Junta thought they could steal territory that belonged to someone else who they considered weak. It came as a shock when Britain rapidly assembled a Task Force and sent it 8,000 miles to eject the Argentine bandits. Once more British troops used great courage to make up for the venial politicians who had allowed the emergency to arise – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Revised Anniversary Edition, 3 Para Mount Longdon, The 
Bloodiest Battle
FILE: R2599
AUTHOR: Jon Cooksey
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  111
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Falklands War, Falklands Liberation, amphibious landings, 
yomping, Argentine bandits, light infantry, parachute troops, elite 
troops, close quarter fighting

ISBN: 1-52671-335-7

IMAGE: B2599.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yd28bw76
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Like many a fascist state before them the Argentine 
Junta thought they could steal territory that belonged to someone 
else who they considered weak. It came as a shock when Britain 
rapidly assembled a Task Force and sent it 8,000 miles to eject the 
Argentine bandits. Once more British troops used great courage to 
make up for the venial politicians who had allowed the emergency to 
arise – Highly Recommended.

Great Britain has always depended on its Royal Navy and soldiers to 
get it out of messes that should never have been allowed to happen. 
Everything was against the Task Force. Alleged EU 'allies' refused to 
supply munitions to the British and actively tried to assist the 
Argentines. There was no close friendly port and everything required 
had to be carried by a hastily assembled fleet that included iconic 
passenger ships quickly modified as troop transports. Vessels sailed 
as they became ready, meaning that supplies were crammed into each 
ship to fill space rather than to aid eventual unloading. The tiny 
volcanic island of Ascesention saw an incredible collection of ship 
assemble. The busy flow of ships boats, landing craft and helicopters 
ferried supplies and equipment around the fleet to provide the order 
that would be required. The Task Force sailed 8,000 miles without 
loss and liberated the first of the islands in the South Atlantic 
that were British territories. The main fleet then sailed the final 
distance to the Falkland Islands and, in a well established British 
tradition, landed where they were least expected. The Argentine 
troops and aircraft on West Falklands were rapidly neutralized and 
the main landing from San Carlos Water was safely established ashore 
and prepared to cross the largely empty space to fall on the main 
Argentine troop concentrations to liberate the British islanders 
from cruel occupation.

In war, things rarely exactly follow the plans but the primary 
factor is final victory. This was spectacularly achieved by the 
British with total defeat of the Argentines. However, it was not 
without incident and it was a victory of British military skill 
and courage in spite of the neglect by politicians. As the 
politicians had refused the Westland proposals for a helicopter 
AEW platform and failed to maintain at least one carrier capable 
of launching the fixed wing Gannet AEW, expensive warships had to 
be deployed as a radar picket shield, resulting in loss of ships 
and a vulnerability that led to the sinking of the Atlantic Conveyor 
which was carrying the Chinook heavy lift helicopters. That in turn 
led to further loss when troops had to be landed from assault ships 
without adequate air cover, unavailable because the lack of suitable 
carriers meant the only fighter defence had to be provided thinly 
by a relatively small number of Sea Harrier VSTOL aircraft.

In effect, British Commando and Para units had to march across a 
bleak landscape in mid winter, without shelter and without heavy 
weapons. These light infantry units took on Argentine troops at 
Darwin-Goose Green, fighting with great courage and determination 
that lost 2 Para's CO 'H' Jones who was awarded the posthumous VC. 
Only two weeks marching later, 2 Para reached Mount Longdon. This 
was a key strategic position that had to be captured to ensure 
defeat of the Argentine invaders. It was an incredibly tough fight 
for lightly armed troops after an exhausting march cross-country. 
With the same courage and ferocity displayed at Darwin-Goose Green, 
2 Para carried the day and the battle witnessed another posthumous VC.

The author has told the story with skill and insight and it is 
excellent that his work, originally published in 2004, has been 
republished in a revised edition. The many photographs are first rate 
and support the insightful text very well.