Railways in the Landscape

B2344

The 19th Century saw an explosion of rail building in the British Isles. By the end of the Century, it was possible to travel by train to almost every part of the mainland. This enabled people who had previously travelled rarely and for short distances to speed up and down the British Isles and to enjoy some of the most fantastic scenery. This delightful book is lavishly illustrated throughout with monochrome and full colour images, a visual treat.

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NAME: Railways in the Landscape
FILE: R2344
AUTHOR: Gordon Biddle
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 248
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: railways, networks, steam trains, bridges, viaducts, embankments, coastline,hills, valleys
ISBN: 1-47386-235-3
IMAGE: B2344.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/hqw97c4
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The 19th Century saw an explosion of rail building in the British Isles. By the end of the Century, it was possible to travel by train to almost every part of the mainland. This enabled people who had previously travelled rarely and for short distances to speed up and down the British Isles and to enjoy some of the most fantastic scenery. This delightful book is lavishly illustrated throughout with monochrome and full colour images, a visual treat.

The development of a national network of railways had an impact on every part of life that cannot be underestimated. For rail travellers, it was not just the freedom to travel, but the speed and the views from the carriages. It was a most exciting time and it reached from the richest to the poorest. For the poorest, the carriages were Spartan and often open to the elements. For the richest, there might be their very own private ‘halt’, provided by the railway owners as part of the payment to be able to traverse the private estates of the rich.

Like the earlier canal networks, railways had a special requirement that made them a visible part of the landscape. Where the canals were governed by the physics of water, requiring flights of locks to scale hills, and aqueducts to traverse valleys, the rail roads required steady inclines and declines, and gentle curves to keep the locomotives on the tracks and able to maintain traction on the iron rails. When they reached a river or inlet, they needed a bridge. The result was that they not only provided views of the natural landscape, but they contributed to it and often with majestic works and advanced technology. They also created new towns, some of them specifically to serve the railways, providing workshops, factories and junctions that kept the trains running and linked various parts of the network.

The author has done a great job in tying all of these visual consequences together with some outstanding illustration. This is a book for rail enthusiasts, historians, but above all for people who want to learn and celebrate the magnificent visual scope of the British Isles and their coastlines.

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