Poland’s Struggle, Before, During and After The Second World War

Poland has suffered a turbulent history but recent history began in 1919 and turbulence continues. The author has provided a sympathetic review of recent Polish history that has not been covered in this way before in an English language publication – Very Highly Recommended

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NAME: Poland's Struggle, Before, During and After The Second World War
FILE: R2974
AUTHOR: Andrew Rawson
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 212
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: 1919, Versailles Treaty, Poland, East Prussia, Danzig Corridor, German 
Invasion, WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, German-Russian 
partition, Warsaw Uprising, Soviet Occupation, puppet government, Cold War, 
Glasnost, Polish liberation, EU interference, NATO, Enigma, code-breaking

ISBN: 1-52674-392-2

IMAGE: B2974.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y2lcxzfl
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Poland has suffered a turbulent history but recent history began in 
1919 and turbulence continues. The author has provided a sympathetic review of 
recent Polish history that has not been covered in this way before in an English 
language publication –  Very Highly Recommended

The history of the area now referred to as Poland has long been turbulent. As part of 
the Duchy of Lithuania, it was part of a State that reached to the Black Sea. As 
Germany began to reorganize, Poland was surrounded by German States that were 
slowly coming together to form a German National State and Poles were never 
treated well. In 1919, it seemed like a natural action to recognize Poland as a nation 
but, like much of the Versailles Treaty it was good intentions, mixed with vengeance, 
badly executed. The Treaty sowed the seeds of WWII and placed Poland at the 
height of German dissatisfaction.

The boundaries of the new Polish nation were artificial, leaving ethnic Germans 
inside the boundaries and some Poles outside. The focus of German irritation was 
the Danzig Corridor that divided Prussia into two blocks, but the new Polish State 
needed a way of reaching the Baltic at Danzig and the Corridor was the only logical 
way of providing this. Hitler simply wanted to expand the Nazi State East, using 
Poland and Russia as new living space, to be colonized by Germans, but he needed 
the support of the Soviet Union initially and this meant agreeing a partition of Poland.

Exactly why Britain and France chose Poland as the point where German expansion 
must be resisted is not entirely clear. They encouraged Poland, but were incapable of 
providing any direct assistance against German aggression. That lack of practical 
support guaranteed that Stalin would support Germany.

Once Poland was occupied by Germany and the Soviet Union, atrocities were 
perpetrated on the Poles by both occupiers. This was conducted on an industrial 
scale, decimating the population and replacing part of it with ethnic Germans from 
the Baltic States. This continued to the end of WWII, with Stalin deliberately holding 
back until the Germans had liquidated the Warsaw Uprising. Potential opposition 
having been conveniently removed by the Germans, the Red Army resumed its 
advance on Berlin and Stalin quickly began occupying Eastern and Central Europe 
as vassal States.

Poland therefore suffered through the Cold War as a Soviet puppet state. Glasnost 
provided the relief that saw Poland becoming independent as a sovereign state, only 
to make the mistake of joining the EU and finding itself locked inside a bureaucracy 
every bit as totalitarian as the USSR had been.

The author has followed the joy and sadness of recent Polish history and given Poles 
the credit they deserved in acquiring German Enigma machines, breaking the codes 
and passing this on to the British code breakers at Bletchley Park who were able to 
shorten WWII and, arguably, win it, or at least avoid defeat, by building on the work 
of Polish code breakers.

Poles will now have to decide if they are to break free from the dictation of Brussels, 
or slip back into submission.