Poland & The Second World War 1938-48

The Second World War had different dates for different countries, starting first in China. The politicians of Britain and France proved unequal to the duplicity of Hitler and his Nazis with the real start date in Europe being the appeasement at Munich in 1938 – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Poland & The Second World War 1938-48
FILE: R3026
AUTHOR: Evan McGilvray
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Danzig Corridor, 
Poland, Free Polish Army, Resistance fighters, Home Army, Communists, Munich, 
German aggression, German invasion, Warsaw Uprising, Red Army, Stalin, betrayal, 
Communist takeover

ISBN: 1-47383-410-4

IMAGE: B3026.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y56ymw2y
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The Second World War had different dates for different countries, 
starting first in China. The politicians of Britain and France proved unequal to the 
duplicity of Hitler and his Nazis with the real start date in Europe being the 
appeasement at Munich in 1938  – Highly Recommended.

The German intentions were already very clear before Munich and their plan was to 
keep expanding into neighbouring countries until they held overwhelming power to 
deal with Britain and France, before moving on to Russia and North America. When 
Chamberlain gave in at Munich the Germans thought they had a green light to 
swallow the Czechs and then Poland, with Denmark, Holland and Belgium being the 
next on the list.

When Britain and France stood firm on the invasion of Poland the Germans did not 
expect it to be more than a token resistance. To reach Poland Anglo-French forces 
would have to enter the Baltic and be at a serious disadvantage. The German and 
Soviet troops advanced through Poland to meet at their agreed partition. The Poles 
tried to put up a stiff resistance but they were out numbered and out gunned. Many 
tried to escape and join Britain and France to fight alongside them in honour until 
the Germans were defeated.

All the Polish efforts produced little result for a free sovereign Poland. The Russians 
sat and waited for the Germans to crush the rising in Warsaw when they could have 
swept in and relieved the Polish Home Army. They did not, because Stalin intended 
to swallow all of Poland and the Germans were doing his work for him. After the 
German surrender, Poles began returning home but they were already too late to 
frustrate Stalin's imperial plans and Poland disappeared behind the Iron Curtain until 
the Soviet defeat in the Cold War. Since then they have joined the European Union 
and are in the process of disappearing behind a new Iron curtain once more under the 
German boot.

The author has made a fine job of telling this bitter sweet story. He has produced a 
study which is the most complete and accurate in the English language.