Pioneers of Armour in the Great War

This Australian perspective has been well-researched and provides a view of all types of armoured vehicles employed during WWI. Descriptive text is supported by many interesting and rare images through the body of the book – Most Highly Recommended.


http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Pioneers of Armour in the Great War
FILE: R2647
AUTHOR: David A Finlayson, Michael K Cecil
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  376
PRICE: £30.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Australian tankers, WWI, World War 1, World War I, First 
World War, Great War, 1914-1918, European theatre, Western Front, 
trench warfare, armoured cars, tanks

ISBN: 1-52671-505-8

IMAGE: B2647.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yaub89t6
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This Australian perspective has been well-researched 
and provides a view of all types of armoured vehicles employed during 
WWI. Descriptive text is supported by many interesting and rare 
images through the body of the book – Most Highly Recommended.

WWI was the first total industrial war in history. It was based on 
machines and technologies never previously deployed in that form. As 
a result, the Germans started with a recreation of the Franco-
Prussian War of 1870 with rapidly advancing cavalry followed by 
infantry and supported by mobile field artillery. That mass assault 
was blunted by the tiny British Expeditionary Force, and then 
rolled back by the BEF and two French Armies, leading to the 
establishment of trench warfare as both side staggered from 
exhaustion. The war then became a great and terrible war of 
attrition and the search for a wonder weapon to break the deadlock. 
It was in that crucible that armoured warfare and aerial forces were 
formed.

It is understandable that most coverage of armour in WWI is written 
around the British tanks, although armour was used from the start 
of the conflict in Europe and the Middle East.

The first attempts were informal when RNAS pilots who had sent 
their private cars across the Channel began fitting armour and 
mounting guns, usually machine guns similar to the types being 
fitted to their aircraft. These vehicles were used for scouting for 
new airfields close to the front and to provide some basic close 
protection to those temporary rough airstrips.

A more formal response was taking place at around the same time and 
saw a number of production types of armoured car, of which the Rolls 
Royce armoured car is perhaps the best known, particularly for the 
part played by small numbers of vehicles in the Middle East. The 
Australians made much use of armoured cars in Libya, Egypt and the 
Middle East. A variety of types of modified commercially produced 
vehicles were used, but the Ford Model T became the most numerous, 
arriving as they had left the production line in the US before armour 
and guns were fitted.

The armoured car was of limited value on the Western Front because it 
could not operate in the mud of the battle lines. The answer was to 
be the result of work by the Royal Navy to build a tracked vehicle 
with heavy armour and a choice of machine guns or canon mounted on 
the sides in sponsons. The classic British tank was eventually 
deployed in numbers and made decisive mass attacks on German trenches, 
but there were other designs. The classic tank was an infantry tank, 
a type that continued in use through WWII, where speed was not a 
major priority because the infantry had to be able to keep up with 
it. However, the first mobile warfare tanks were starting to emerge, 
built for speed and cross country performance, with a top mounted 
turret mounting a main gun.

This book recounts the experience of Australian armoured forces 
during WWI.