Parliament’s Generals, Supreme Command & Politics During The British Wars 1642-51

Considering the nature and importance of the English Civil War, surprisingly little attention has been paid by historians to the politics. This new book looks at the five most famous and effective Generals leading troops on the side of Parliament in respect of the politics involved. – Highly Recommended

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NAME: Parliament's Generals, Supreme Command & Politics During The British 
Wars 1642-51
FILE: R2841
AUTHOR: Malcolm Wanklyn
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 212
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: English Civil War, Roundheads, Cavaliers, Parliament, Charles I, battles, 
strategy, tactics, organization, training, Puritans, Levellers, New Model Army, politics

ISBN: 1-47389-836-6

IMAGE: B2841.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y5gcmvha
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   Considering the nature and importance of the English Civil 
War, surprisingly little attention has been paid by historians to the politics. This 
new book  looks at the five most famous and effective Generals leading troops 
on the side of Parliament in respect of the politics involved. – Highly 
Recommended

There are many books providing histories of the English Civil War. Of these a large 
number are long out of print, and few have paid any real attention to the politics 
involved in the command of troops, having a focus on the battles themselves and the 
factors leading up to the outbreak of civil war.

There was no clear neat division of soldiers into two opposing groups. As with most 
civil wars it was brother against brother, father against son. As a result, both sides 
overlapped in backgrounds, with former comrades taking opposing sides. The King 
had no monopoly on trained soldiers and neither did Parliament. The Puritan element 
of the Parliamentary forces was strong but it covered a range of non-conformist 
beliefs from those who were comfortable with the Low Church, within the Church 
of England, to the extreme puritans and Levellers who were as much a political belief
 as a religious group. Similarly, the Kings forces ranged from Roman Catholics to 
Protestants to those bordering on the puritan view of religious belief.

In the same way that religious groups covered a wide range of beliefs on both sides, 
there was a similar broad range of social backgrounds, with Parliament including 
land owners, nobility, middle classes of merchants and craftsmen, to the poorest 
elements of society. The King may have had a stronger following of nobility and 
land owners, but his troops also came from the middle classes and the poorest 
workers. That created a very complex set of cultures and politics running up from 
the foot soldiers to the most powerful generals. As much effort frequently went into 
political manoeuvring as into moving troops around the battle fields. On the 
Parliament side, their generals, below the most senior, were part of a changing 
fraternity with new commanders coming forward to replace those who started the 
first battles. There was dissatisfaction amongst the army and the Civil War went 
through several stages to the point that some refer to the later stages as the Third
 Civil War.

The author has examined the strengths and weaknesses of the senior commanders 
and of the new men emerging to command. There are many fresh insights and the 
author has looked carefully at the relative man-management skills of the initial 
command and the new figures coming forward and steering a course to the top 
through political skill as well as controlling troops in battle. This makes an 
absorbing study that covers much new ground.

Readers with a special interest in the military history of the English Civil War will 
find this an indispensable source of information and insight. It is also a very good 
point to start a study of the period. The English Civil War should be studied carefully 
by anyone with an interest in politics, military practice and social history because 
this period shaped not only the development of Britain, and its expanding colonies, 
but it has shaped the history of the World since that time. It was a critical stage in 
the development of modern democracy and it changed the nature of the colonies into 
the development of a powerful Empire that dominated the World in a generally 
benevolent and productive manner, a process not however without pain.