Panzer Rollen, The Logistics of a Panzer Division From Primary Sources

This book is based on two intelligence reports that were produced from translations of captured German documents. The Panzer Division was constrained by logistics more often than supported. This primary source information provides a unique insight. – Highly Recommended

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NAME: Panzer Rollen, The Logistics of a Panzer Division From Primary Sources
FILE: R2809
AUTHOR: 
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Coda Publishing
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 127
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, World War 2, Second World War, Cold War, 
intelligence services, Panzer Division, logistics, intelligence digests

ISBN: 1-47386-880-7

IMAGE: B2809.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yxara666
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   This book is based on two intelligence reports that were 
produced from translations of captured German documents. The Panzer 
Division was constrained by logistics more often than supported. This primary 
source information provides a unique insight. -  Highly Recommended

When Germany began in WWII, the concept of a combined arms force of armoured fighting vehicles, 
mechanized infantry and close air support was still awaiting enough new equipment to fully engage in 
action. Much of German transport, even to hauling artillery pieces, depended on the horse. The early 
armoured vehicles were relatively thin-skinned, lightly armed, often defeated by terrain, an mechanically 
unreliable. The Pkw I and II tanks were light reconnaissance vehicles more suited for training than 
combat. By the end of WWII, the German Army was largely independent of the horse in the front line 
and equipped with some formidable armoured vehicles, but these were in generally inadequate numbers 
and short of fuel and ammunition.

The fast moving armoured Division introduced new demands on logistics. After the first struggle to 
ensure an adequate number of support vehicles and equipment to move the essential supplies to the 
armour, there was the not inconsiderable challenge of working out where to send the supplies when the 
battle front could be fast moving.

This book is essentially two German field manuals. One deals with the armoured fighting vehicles and 
the second deals with the mechanized infantry. Together they provide a unique insight, from the German 
point of view, into the operation of armoured forces in the field. This is essential reading for any 
historians and enthusiasts studying the armoured warfare of WWII.