Painting Wargaming Figures, WWII in the Desert

A must-have book for wargamers, but highly desirable for a wider readership. This is well-written and lavishly illustrated guide book that provides important tips for painting wargaming figures, but also for larger display figures – Highly Recommended

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NAME: Painting Wargaming Figures, WWII in the Desert
FILE: R2936
AUTHOR: Andy Singleton
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 157
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War,  North Africa, 
8th Army, 7th Armoured Division, war gaming, display figures, metal models, plastic 
models, soft plastic models, paint techniques, scale model vehicles

ISBN: 1-52671–631-3

IMAGE: B2936.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yxg4tbbz
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A must-have book for wargamers, but highly desirable for a wider 
readership. This is well-written and lavishly illustrated guide book that provides
 important tips for painting wargaming figures, but also for larger display 
figures –  Highly Recommended

The wargaming hobby goes back into ancient history. In its modern form it 
continues to attract a growing number of enthusiasts, even though the reducing 
costs of high performance computers and simulation software provides serious 
competition. There are however some big differences between the two forms of 
simulated combat and many enthusiasts will follow both options because the 
experiences are complimentary.

Computer wargaming started with closed gaming on a single machine but has now 
expanded into on-line gaming where enthusiasts can join a war game with others 
scattered across the World. It is already migrating into true virtual reality gaming 
where the images are approaching the level of filmed people. What it does not do is 
provide the rich functionality of planning tabletop battles with scale model figures, 
vehicles and equipment, resembling more closely a chess game, where detailed 
knowledge, gained from painstaking research, is combined with strategies and tactics.

A key element of wargaming is the acquisition of accurate figures and equipment, 
together with the construction of accurate scale dioramas. Anyone developing an 
interest in wargaming can purchase completed figures and other items from specialist 
retailers and from auctions, but it is clear that many wargamers find the completion 
of these items an important part of the hobby and a source of interest and satisfaction.

This book provides a very nicely written advisory with many tips for the modeller. 
Although the book deals primarily with painting WWII Desert figures, it also 
includes matching scale models. The book concludes with a list of suppliers which 
is extensive but, perhaps, not fully comprehensive because some wargamers 
augment their incomes but producing very small numbers of specialist subjects for 
other wargamers. The mainline suppliers often offer a wide range of figures in metal 
and in both soft and hard plastic. The level of assembly can vary with some 
suppliers offering kits of many parts and other providing fairly complete figures. 
Most of these require painting and also offer scope for modification.

Model soldiers have always held a fascination for collectors. Typically this type of 
modelling is based on larger scale sizes, where the collection develops in a 
relatively narrow field, such as single models of soldiers from all of the units 
engaged in the Battle of Waterloo. Although this is a different hobby from the one 
directly addressed by this book, the techniques of painting can be successfully 
applied to exhibit figures which may form part of a diorama that centres on one or 
more military vehicles.