Operation Banner, The British Army in Northern Ireland, 1969-2007

This is perhaps the first comprehensive review of the military involvements in Northern Ireland by the British Army. – The author has set the historical scene and then provided a compelling account of the series of actions that were required under the overall operation in Ulster – Highly Recommended.


http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://brn.firetrench.com

http://bsd.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Operation Banner, The British Army in Northern Ireland, 1969-
2007
FILE: R2563
AUTHOR: Nick van der Bijl
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  272
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Insurgents, counter insurgency, tactics, equipment, 
personnel, political will, asymmetric warfare, covert warfare, 
terrorism, religious division, civil liberty, murder, terror, 
bombings

ISBN: 1-47389-895-1

IMAGE: B2563jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ybn248gv
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This is perhaps the first comprehensive review of the 
military involvements in Northern Ireland by the British Army.  - The 
author has set the historical scene and then provided a compelling 
account of the series of actions that were required under the overall 
operation in Ulster – Highly Recommended.

Conflict in Ireland has existed as far as history is recorded. When 
Alcock and Brown were interviewed before their successful trans-
Atlantic flight, they were asked how they would know which country 
they had landed in. They said that if they found a couple making 
love in a haystack they would know it was France, if they found a 
group of men playing cricket it had to be England, but if they found 
two men in a bog beating each other with lumps of wood they would 
know they had reached Ireland. That may have been an attempt at 
humour but it did sum up a popular view of life in Ireland, where 
there would be conflict with anyone who was considered an outsider 
but, if all 'outsiders' were expelled, the conflict would carry on 
between the indigenous population. The last two men standing might 
have long been allies but were then fighting the only opponent 
available.

Whatever the background and the reasons for hundreds of years of 
civil strife in Northern Ireland, the 'recent troubles' began in 
1969 as civil rights campaigners created demonstrations that were 
taken over by the men of violence and responded to by another group 
of men of violence. The British Government was placed in an 
impossible position. They had to restore stability and deal with the 
growing violence in what was and is a part of the United Kingdom, 
where the majority expressed a clear desire to remain a part of the 
UK.

The only option was to send in the Army and initially they were 
welcomed as saviours by both sides of the conflict. However, 
soldiers are never the ideal solution to restore civil peace. It is 
also very easy for terrorists to paint them as 'invaders'. Violence 
continues and escalates. That is what happened in Northern Ireland 
in a repeat of the bitter civil war and genocide in the Irish 
Republic when it became independent from the UK. Some of those 
living in Ulster in 1969 were refugees, or children of refugees, 
from the sectarian extremism in the Irish Republic.

The spiral of violence inevitably increased and was exported by the 
IRA to other parts of the UK. Had the Army not been sent in, 
increasing violence would have occurred anyway. Another army might 
have brutally cracked down on the civil population, but the British 
Army operated with restraint and some tolerance and humour, leading 
to conditions where a peace could be formally established. How long 
that peace will hold remains to be seen. The IRA godfathers continued 
to operate after the power sharing had been agreed and at the time of 
the publication of this new book, the IRA political arm has withdrawn 
from the power sharing government which may force the suspension of 
the Government in Northern Ireland and the return of rule from 
Westminster. It is difficult to escape the conclusion that the men 
of violence in the IRA political arm are hoping to force the return 
of British troops to Ulster in the hope of promoting a new IRA 
terror campaign.