On The Road To Victory, The Rise of Motor Transport with the BEF on the Western Front

With so many technical innovations, it is perhaps understandable that the impact of motor transport during The Great War has received such poor coverage. The introduction of motor transport with the BEF made a critical contribution to eventual victory. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: On The Road To Victory, The Rise of Motor Transport with the BEF on the 
Western Front
FILE: R3104
AUTHOR: Michael Harrison
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £19.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War I, World War 1, World War One, First World War, The 
Great War, motor cars, lorries, tractors, buses, armoured cars, tanks, petrol, 
mechanics, drivers, military personnel, civilians, ambulances

ISBN: 1-52676-043-0

PAGES: 292
IMAGE: B3104.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/whgd76j
DESCRIPTION: With so many technical innovations, it is perhaps understandable 
that the impact of motor transport during The Great War has received such poor 
coverage. The introduction of motor transport with the BEF made a critical 
contribution to eventual victory. – Most Highly Recommended.

The  provision of lorries to carry troops, supplies, and ammunition was a revolution 
in mobility that has largely been lost in the terrible static trench warfare. The 
deliberate design and construction of vehicles specifically to provide motorized 
transport was a major achievement but so too were the rather more ad hoc provisions.

The RNAS sent fighter squadrons to France to fight alongside the RFC and the 
French Air Force. RNAS pilots often took their own motor cars with them and used 
them for transport, communications and as armoured cars for airfield protection and 
ground reconnaissance. This was very much ad hoc and at the initiative of individuals. 
Armour was added by squadron engineers and machine guns 'borrowed' for mounting 
on the vehicles for defensive purposes. Famously, London buses and taxis were sent 
to France to move reinforcements up to the line, again an ad hoc use of motor vehicles 
ahead of the deliberate provision of adequate purpose built vehicles.

The author has provided an engaging account of how the BEF benefited from motor 
transport with an excellent selection of images through the body of the book in 
support of the well-researched text. Included in the story are the girl drivers who 
joined the transport teams and the modified tanks that were used to carry supplies and 
troops, with a very rare photograph of a prototype Armoured Personnel Carrier that 
arrived too late to see action.