On Operations With C Squadron SAS, Terrorist Pursuit & Rebel Attacks In Cold War Africa

The Cold War was a hot war for the SAS in the Middle East and Africa. This is an untold story that provides unique insight into how the SAS were employed during the Cold War. Very Highly Recommended

NAME:  On Operations With C Squadron SAS, Terrorist Pursuit & Rebel Attacks In 
Cold War Africa
FILE: R3306
AUTHOR: Michael Graham
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £19.99                                                
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Cold War, Africa, Middle East, surrogate wars, insurgency, rebellion, 
tribal conflict, Communist infiltration, Soviet Union, USSR, Cuba, South Africa, 
Rhodesia, Angola, Mozambique, Renamo, MPLA, Frelimo, ZANU, Margaret 
Thatcher, Mugabe, SAS

ISBN: 1-52677-281-7

PAGES: 172, 16 page b&w photo plate section and b&w maps in the body of text
IMAGE: B3306.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y39tnx3y
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The Cold War was a hot war for the SAS in the Middle East and 
Africa. This is an untold story that provides unique insight into how the SAS were 
employed during the Cold War.  Very Highly Recommended

The Cold War was a very new form of warfare that was forced by the potential for development into a nuclear conflict. The seizure of central and Easter Europe by the Soviets after WWII carried the same potential for war as had the German expansion before the start of WWII and the Western nations had to resist any temptation to slip back into the failed policy of appeasement that had only delayed the start of WWII and given Germany advantages that did not need to be gifted.

After a costly Korean War, the Soviets concentrated on small, and not so small, hot wars fought through surrogates. Many of these wars were particularly nasty and required the use of highly trained special forces to fight the Communists. The SAS was an obvious choice for Britain and they fought both as mercenaries, temporarily released by MOD, and as official British contributions to the conflicts.

With intelligence units and special forces, it is always a fine line between providing an important addition to our knowledge of history and protecting details of operational measures that may still be highly sensitive and continue to apply to current conflicts. When memoirs appear for these organizations, the reader has to decide how far the information is accurate and how much is deliberate misinformation, how far the information is sanctioned and checked. There was a tradition that the SAS never talked about what it was called on to do, but there have been an increasing number of memoirs released during the last two decades.

This account of SAS actions in Africa as part of the Cold War is lively interesting, nicely written and feels authentic. The photographs are particularly interesting in support of the text. A fascinating read.