Nuremberg’s Voice of Doom, The Autobiography of the Chief Interpreter at History’s Greatest Trials

The memoirs of Wolfe Frank lay hidden in an attic for more than twenty five years. The author has provided a unique insight into the war crimes trials that followed Victory in Europe – Most Recommended

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NAME: Nuremberg's Voice of Doom, The Autobiography of the Chief Interpreter 
at History's Greatest Trials
FILE: R2750
AUTHOR: Wolfe Frank
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword 
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 202
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, World War Two, Show Trials. War 
criminals, international trials, interpreter, languages, German Nazis

ISBN: 1-52673-751-5

IMAGE: B2750.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y8mc8nuk
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  The memoirs of Wolfe Frank lay hidden in an attic for more 
than twenty five years.  The author has provided a unique insight into the war 
crimes trials that followed Victory in Europe -  Most Recommended

This ex-German, ex-British officer became the Chief Interpreter at the show trials 
held in Nuremberg at the end of WWII. He was therefore in a position to offer a 
unique set of insights into the people and events, together with the impact they had 
on him.

There will always be controversy about the War Crime Trials. They were as much 
symbolic as practical. They produced verdicts that were highly variable, with some 
defendants receiving what others regarded as too light, or too severe, a sentence. 
They were strongly supported by the Soviets and the Americans as Show Trials of 
a defeated enemy and they refused to accept the defence of 'following orders'. They 
failed to bring many to trial who were highly deserving of trial and the prize eluded 
them, because Hitler had cheated them by committing suicide before he could be 
captured, and his second in command, Goering, cheated them by committing suicide 
before his hanging sentence could be carried out. The strange figure of Hess was the 
only prize, which the Soviets insisted on serving a life sentence, even though many 
considered him mad and who had left the stage long before the end when he flew to 
Britain. Hess really became the excuse for the Soviets to have some troops in West 
Berlin.

The public in Allied and liberated countries were initially enthusiastic about the trials 
but they soon became bored. The developing tensions between the Soviets and the 
Americans led to many potential trial subjects being spirited out of Germany and put 
to use by their new masters. Notably, von Braun, who had been closely implicated in 
the use of slave labour on the V1 cruise missile and V2 rocket programs, not only 
escaped trial, but was to be honoured by the Americans as the father of their manned 
space flight program and the creator of rockets to launch the US nuclear weapons in 
event of WWIII. 

The author lived through this extra ordinary trial process. He was a critical part of it 
and he receive plaudits from all of the Allies for his services. However he was marked 
by the process in much the same way as an executioner. Daily he had to sit with a 
selection of monsters and those caught up in events that they might otherwise have 
wished to avoid. As each was tried, the most appalling events and atrocities were 
described. Jurors often find sadistic murder trials a corrosive burden, exposing them 
to acts beyond they previous imagining. Frank was exposed acts where millions had 
been treated with great brutality and killed in the most atrocious circumstances.

Whether the Nuremberg Trials actually achieved anything positive is highly 
questionable. Previous practices might have achieved more where a victor quickly 
took the most important prisoners out and executed them without giving them one 
more chance to present their beliefs. As the trials trundled on, the variable treatment 
of prisoners and the success of some to fool the judges and get off lightly showed 
up some of the serious weaknesses of the program.

The author has provided a fascinating account of how he got where he was as 
Interpreter, how the trials progressed and his unique insights into those defendants 
he was most closely linked to as Chief Interpreter.