Normandy’s Nightmare War, The French Experience of Nazi Occupation and Allied Bombing 1940-45

Normandy had long been a pleasant productive green land, until 1940 when the German occupiers arrived. The sad fate was for the area to be terrorised by the Germans and bombed by the Allies before they arrived in force and fought through the towns of Normandy to liberate them – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Normandy's Nightmare War, The French Experience of Nazi Occupation 
and Allied Bombing 1940-45
FILE: R2960
AUTHOR: Douglas Boyd
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £18.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War,  German 
Occupation, special forces, covert operations, airborne forces, paratroops, assault 
gliders, light infantry, supply drops, armour, civilians, D-Day, carpet bombing, 
breakout, liberation

ISBN: 1-52674-581-X

IMAGE: B2960.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y6238ecc
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: Normandy had long been a pleasant productive green land, until 
1940 when the German occupiers arrived. The sad fate was for the area to be 
terrorised by the Germans and bombed by the Allies before they arrived in 
force and fought through the towns of Normandy to liberate them  –   Very 
Highly Recommended.

The Normandy experience during WWII was filled with terror and this cruel story 
is told by those who lived through the testing times. There were certainly some 
French who detested the terror brought on them by the Nazis and the Allies, but the 
general feeling of the inhabitants was that they accepted Allied bombing as a 
necessary price to pay for liberation.

As in any war, there were a few who profited greatly from the conflict, and the 
many who suffered to some extent. Under occupation that continued. After liberation 
the inhabitants faced a long hard struggle to rebuild and return to a peaceful existence.

The Germans terrorised the people of Normandy in several ways. Just marching 
down the street was an offence to the Normans. Forcing civilians and POWs to work 
on the construction of fortifications was direct hardship. The people of Normandy
 rapidly formed Resistance Groups, collecting intelligence for the Allies and 
conducting sabotage. The Germans responded by rounding up hostages to 
encourage Frenchmen to inform on the Resistance. Inevitably, the population held 
firm the Germans began killing hostages and making life hard for the survivors.

Ahead of D-Day, the daily bombing of the area increased greatly, but bombing had 
been a fact of life since the Occupation began and had been growing in intensity. The 
inhabitants of Normandy stoically endured. Then the beach landings began, creating 
hope and more terror. That continued until the Germans were removed by the Allies 
and reconstruction could begin. Exactly how many civilians were killed by the 
bombing may never be known but in one raid alone some 3,000 were killed and 
many thousands of raids from 1940 killed so many more.

The author has lived in France for more than forty years and this book has been built 
on the research and interviews he has undertaken over that period.