Navies in the 21st Century

B2363

This new book follows the successful approach and format of the very popular naval annual Seaforth’s World Naval Review. Under the same editor, a new team of specialists have been assembled to write authoritative articles in their particular fields of expertise.The absorbing text is fully supported by many outstanding images – Most Recommended.

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NAME: Navies in the 21st Century
FILE: R2363
AUTHOR: edited by Conrad Waters
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 256
PRICE: £35.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Maritime, ships, navy, naval, military, technology, weapons systems, deployment, international relations, war, tension, UAV, UAS
ISBN: 978-1-4738-4991-4
IMAGE: B2363jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/z9ajbsc
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This new book follows the successful approach and format of the very popular naval annual Seaforth’s World Naval Review. Under the same editor, a new team of specialists have been assembled to write authoritative articles in their particular fields of expertise.
The absorbing text is fully supported by many outstanding images – Most Recommended.

This is an exciting time for the development and introduction of new types of warship and associated weapons. Even countries, such as Great Britain, where politicians have tried to decimate their navies, some significant new vessels are completing design, or under construction, and due to enter service shortly. The Queen Elizabeth Class carriers completing construction and fitting out, provide platforms for the Lighting II VSTOL jet fighter and a range of new helicopter and tilt rotor machines that will expand the role of the carrier in RN service and provide a significant increase in capability.

However, some of the greatest changes are represented by low observable technology and Unmanned Vehicles that will replace some warship types and greatly increase the capabilities of others. In the process, the rapid developments in radar, command systems and automation continues to reduce the number of sailors required to safely and effectively operate the new vessels.

The changes in naval air and surface fleet equipment and capabilities are being matched by sub-sea capabilities. Again, Unmanned Vehicles are making a serious entry and submarines are receiving new weapons systems that expand their potential roles. This expansion of capability provides some resilience in many areas of operational need. The British Vanguard submarines are ageing rapidly and the political delays before commitment to the new ‘successor’ missile submarines pose a risk that any development and building delays in the new boats could create a gap in the nuclear deterrent. However, nuclear armed cruise missiles can be fired from other classes in service to bridge any gap and there are developments in missile design that could see smaller sea-launched ballistic missile operated from alternative vessels to bridge any deterrent gaps and augment the ‘successor’ class submarines. That could become increasingly important as the need for a main deterrent weapon platform and missile will continue, but the proliferation of nuclear technology may require a wider choice to provide a comprehensive deterrent.

The number of navies able to mount global operations is increasing and the size of their fleets also increases. This is creating a more volatile situation and causing the increase of tension in many parts of the world.

The editor and his team have provided a very effective review of these changes. Great insights and a huge amount of information.

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