Napoleon’s Imperial Guard, Uniforms and Equipment, The Cavalry

This is the second volume of a series, covering Napoleon’s elite troops. The uniforms and equipment of the Imperial Guard Cavalry Regiments is beautifully illustrated with images in the form of coloured drawings and photographs of museum exhibits – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Napoleon's Imperial Guard, Uniforms and Equipment, The Cavalry
FILE: R2996
AUTHOR: Paul L Dawson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline books
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £40.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Napoleonic Wars, Imperial Guard, cavalry, mounted force, equipment, 
weapons, uniform, elite force, Chasseurs a Cheval, Mamelukes, clothing, training, 
deployment, tactics

ISBN: 978-1-52670-896-0

IMAGE: B2996.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y26b7fry
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: This is the second volume of a series, covering Napoleon's elite 
troops. The uniforms and equipment of the Imperial Guard Cavalry Regiments 
is beautifully illustrated with images in the form of coloured drawings and 
photographs of museum exhibits – Highly Recommended.

The Imperial Guard were Napoleon’s ‘closers’, deployed to bring the battle to a successful conclusion. The first volume of this series reviewed the infantry. To come soon is a volume reviewing Napoleon’s Waterloo Army. The approach is comprehensive text supported by many illustrations in full colour through the main body of text and supported further by tables of information.

The nations on the mainland of Europe all depended primarily on land forces. Although France and Denmark had built formidable naval resources, the deciding factor in international relations was through the land forces. Britain concentrated its primary effort on maintaining the Royal Navy which was logical because home waters produced an extensive coastline and trade was with the world, depending on long sea routes that required protection. Britain also distrusted a large standing army.

With the land forces, all European nations maintained elite ‘guards’ formations, including the British. Napoleon developed a successful battle formula of opening with artillery, putting in his first waves of infantry and then using his Imperial Guard to bring the battle to conclusion. As Wellington disappointedly remarked at Waterloo, ‘Napoleon was a pounder’, happy to depend on brute force and accept heavy casualties.

This book provides one of the most complete analyses of the Imperial Guard Cavalry Regiments and the illustrations provide the most complete visual review. Many illustrations have never appeared in print before, including illustrations commissioned specifically for the book. The result is an impeccable information source for historians, military history enthusiasts and re-enactors, but it is also a visual treat that will appeal to a wider readership in the enjoyment of its colourful illustration.