Modern Conflict Archaeology, Nazi Prisons in the British Isles, Political Prisoners During The German Occupation Of Jersey & Guernsey 1940-1945

Britain had to abandon the Channel Islands in 1940 and did not even have adequate time to evacuate significant numbers of the population. The Germans started with a soft approach but political prisoners increased and the occupation became harsh, not least because the German logistics operation was unable to supply all the food and medicines required Very Highly Recommended

NAME:  Modern Conflict Archaeology, Nazi Prisons in the British Isles, Political 
Prisoners During The German Occupation Of Jersey & Guernsey 1940-1945
FILE: R3376
AUTHOR: Gilly Carr
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                              
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Second World War, WWII, World War II, World War 2, Channel Islands, 
Jersey, Guernsey, German Occupation, work camps, death camps, prisons, evacuation

ISBN: 1-52677-093-8

PAGES: 209,  many images in B&W through the body of the book
IMAGE: B3376.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/3hy23zv2
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Britain had to abandon the Channel Islands in 1940 and did not 
even have adequate time to evacuate significant numbers of the population. The 
Germans started with a soft approach but political prisoners increased and the 
occupation became harsh, not least because the German logistics operation was 
unable to supply all the food and medicines required  Very Highly Recommended

The memories of islanders are naturally difficult. Some never understood why the islands had not been defended. Some were evacuated and of those able to leave, some stayed out of duty. One young teacher was in his first teaching post at a Channel Isles school and decided that he could not leave his pupils. He later became a member of the resistance force that supplied information to Britain, discomforted the Germans when opportunities presented, and assisted some covert landings.

As the German grip tightened and became increasingly hostile, many islanders spent time in jail for some malefaction against the rules of occupation, but most of these were sent to prison in France for short sentences and then returned. Some were less fortunate and ended up in concentration camps in Germany and Poland, from which they never returned. This book is ground breaking and uses material from those who endured and the friends and relatives of those who died. Many fresh insights make this an important book.