Leningrad Under Siege, First-Hand Accounts Of The Ordeal

Primary source material from those who were there. The siege of Leningrad was a long and bloody contest between two ideologies that did not worry deeply about high casualty rates – Very Highly Recommended

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NAME: Leningrad Under Siege, First-Hand Accounts Of The Ordeal
FILE: R2981
AUTHOR: Ales Adamovich, Danil Granin, editors Dr Clare Burstall, Dr Vladimir 
Kisselnikov
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 210
PRICE: £15.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War Two, World War 2, World War II, WWII, Second World War, 
Great Patriotic War, Eastern Front, German Army, Soviet Army, Soviet civilians, 
siege, starvation, Living Space

ISBN: 1-52676-081-9

IMAGE: B2981.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y28mmixe
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Primary source material from those who were there. The siege of 
Leningrad was a long and bloody contest between two ideologies that did not 
worry deeply about high casualty rates –   Very Highly Recommended

The German conduct of WWII was filled with failures and poor judgement, much 
resulting from Hitler's lack of skills to act as the overall commander. The pact 
between the Germans and the Soviets was mutually necessary in 1939 to enable 
German occupation of Poland. Agreeing to share the spoils was only a temporary 
concession because Hitler always intended to invade the USSR, engage in 'ethnic 
cleansing' and re-settle ethnic Germans in the place of the Soviets.

The Soviets were equally committed under Stalin to treat the agreement as temporary 
until they could invade Germany. The result was that it was only a question of who 
acted first and when. Hitler ordered the German invasion of the USSR without 
considering the approaching winter and with poor intelligence about the risks 
involved in invading a huge country that was either deep mud or deep snow for much 
of the year, leaving a relatively short campaign season when mechanized forces could 
be reliably deployed.

The key target should have been the rich agricultural land of the Ukraine and the 
vital oilfields in the Caucasus. Instead of agreeing the plans of his High Command, 
Hitler allowed himself to be seduced into attempting to conquer Leningrad, Moscow 
and Stalingrad. Stalin had the same commitment to defend these three cities on the 
basis of ideology rather than military objectives that Hitler held to destroy them. 
That guaranteed a bitter and bloody conflict. For the Germans, it also meant dividing 
forces so that nowhere would the German line be strong enough to meet any 
objectives.

Stalin was prepared to sacrifice his troops and accept appalling casualty figures. 
Hitler was happy to wipe out Soviet troops and civilians as part of his political 
objective to provide space for ethnic Germans. That meant that his sieges of the 
cities did not aim to starve the populations to force surrender, but to starve the the 
populations to death.

The first-hand accounts of those involved in the conflict are harrowing. Survival 
became the priority on both sides, as the Russian Winter took a heavy toll on the 
Germans. Conditions were so grim that cannibalism became common. The graphic 
descriptions of their lives and experiences by those who were there are reinforced 
by a grim selection of images in a full photo-plate section.