Leading The Roman Army, Soldiers & Emperors, 31 BC- AD 235

The emperors and soldiers were frequently the same and the post of emperor could also be a poisoned chalice to be avoided by generals. The replacement of the Republic with the Empire did not remove the Senate, but the Legions were used as a power base by emperors Very Highly Recommended

NAME:    Leading The Roman Army, Soldiers & Emperors, 31 BC- AD 235
FILE: R3254
AUTHOR: Jonathan Eaton
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £19.99                                                             
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Ancient Rome, Roman Republic, Roman Empire, Fall of Rome, 
emperors, soldiers, generals, the Legions, tactics, strategy, power, politics, Senate, 
citizens

ISBN: 1-53676-328-1

PAGES: 202
IMAGE: B3254.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yyrdyrbo
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The emperors and soldiers were frequently the same and the post 
of emperor could also be a poisoned chalice to be avoided by generals.  The 
replacement of the Republic with the Empire did not remove the Senate, but the 
Legions were used as a power base by emperors   Very Highly Recommended


Roman grew from a City State, one of many, to become an Empire that controlled almost all of the known world. It depended on two things, slaves and soldiers. During the Republic, it seemed that Senators exercised political power, but always there was the army and ambitious generals. In the same way, the Empire did not sweep away the Senate and every Emperor had to carefully consider the Senators before employing the army in the exercise of power. We know a great deal about Ancient Rome but there are also many very large gaps in our knowledge. Recent discoveries have revolutionized how we see the Roman army and the author has been able to take advantage of these fresh insights.

What can make Roman history confusing is that there is considerable overlap between army, Senate and emperors. To become emperor required control of the army and that meant that emperors were usually generals. Some continued to influence warfare closely but others were more interested in staying alive and using political power. The Senators were as likely to be soldiers or former soldiers as intellectuals and politicians. A high percentage of the citizens served at some point in the army. The Roman nobility was a primary source of Senators, Generals and army officers.

This book is an engaging exposition with a useful colour plate section in illustration. Some of the old myths are dispelled and recent discoveries add further depth to the Roman history.