Images of War, Wingate’s Men, The Chindit Operations: Special Forces in Burma

The Images of War series has been building into a unique and impressive visual military history, offering rare images with concise text at very aggressive pricing. This new addition covers one of the most neglected theatres of war and one of the most neglected organizations, the Chindits – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Images of War, Wingate's Men, The Chindit Operations: Special Forces in 
Burma
FILE: R3066
AUTHOR: Colin Higgs
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Far East, Asian 
Theatre, Burma, India, Japanese Army, special forces, guerilla warfare, jungle 
warfare, deep penetration raids, Orde Wingate, air support, air drops, rough landing 
fields

ISBN: 1-52674-667-0

PAGES: 117
IMAGE: B3066.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/ydzsym7k
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The Images of War series has been building into a unique and 
impressive visual military history, offering rare images with concise text at very 
aggressive pricing. This new addition covers one of the most neglected theatres of 
war and one of the most neglected organizations, the Chindits – Most Highly 
Recommended.

The story of the Chindits has yet to be told definitively but this book provides an 
outstanding selection of rare images, together with concise text. With the 
concentration of attention on the European Theatre, and North Africa, for the British, 
and similar concentration on the island hopping campaign in the Pacific for 
Americans, the hard fought engagements in Burma have largely been missed.

Colonel Wingate proposed a long range jungle group, along the lines of the very 
successful Long Range Desert Group. This called for relatively large scale special 
forces deploying far behind the enemy front line. In Burma there were a whole new 
set of challenges because of the terrain and jungle which the British had been slow to 
adapt to. The LRDG faced its own challenges in the desert of North Africa but had the 
advantage of being able to use vehicles for mobility. In Burma, the position of the 
Chindits might be unknown, making air support very difficult. Initially they were 
largely on their own, on foot, using mules to carry the heavier loads, and moving 
through very difficult ground conditions where sickness was a greater enemy than the 
Japanese.

Initially Wingate was given the 77th Infantry  Brigade. He advanced into Burma with 
three Japanese Divisions trying to find and destroy him. Air drops of essential 
supplies were often taken by the Japanese and Wingate did very well to return with 
the troops that he did. They were exhausted, riddled with sickness and losses had been 
very heavy. However, their performance had been sufficient to justify building on 
their initial experience. Wingate proposed a much larger force flown in to rough 
landing strips cut out of the jungle.

Wingate was not to live to see the considerable success of his efforts, being killed in 
an air crash on his way to a Chindit base. This book provides a very graphic account 
of a story that deserves to be told fully.