Images of War, US Military Helicopters, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

A new addition to the very popular Images At War Series that includes mostly full colour photographs. The helicopter story has developed since 1945 and rotary wing aircraft have made some impressive advances which are nicely detailed in this new book, with some clear introductory text, good captions and extended captions, with some longer sections of text. As always the images are outstanding. – highly recommended.


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NAME: Images of War, US Military Helicopters, Rare Photographs 
From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2630
AUTHOR: Michael Green
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  220
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Helicopters, rotary wing, troops transport, vertical 
insertion, vertical extraction, gunship, fire support, fire base, 
column warfare, Vietnam, Middle East

ISBN: 1-47389-484-0

IMAGE: B2630.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y9v5tvqc
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A new addition to the very popular Images At War 
Series that includes mostly full colour photographs. The helicopter 
story has developed since 1945 and rotary wing aircraft have made 
some impressive advances which are nicely detailed in this new book, 
with some clear introductory text, good captions and extended 
captions, with some longer sections of text. As always the images 
are outstanding.  – highly recommended.

Attempts at rotary wing flight started in the earliest days of 
aviation but it was not until the 1930s that viable aircraft 
arrived, and then initially in the form of the autogiro. Sikorski 
produced one of the first viable helicopters and work proceeded 
through WWII. The American aircraft designers produced most of the 
models available into and through the Korean War, but some of the 
first use in combat zones was by the British using US-built 
Sikorski designs and then license-built versions. The first 
limited use was before the end of WWII, using the Sikorski R4B, 
Hoverfly in British service, and sometimes using US pilots. This 
included the evacuation of Chindits wounded in the fighting in 
Burma as these Special Forces battled behind Japanese lines, 
depending very heavily on aircraft to re-supply them, bring in 
reinforcements and evacuate the wounded and sick.

After WWII, Britain fought a very successful campaign against 
Chinese insurgents in Malaya. Unlike the disastrous campaigns by 
the French, and later the US, in Indo China, the British used 
mainly small groups of special forces and expended at least as 
much effort on winning hearts and minds of the indigenous Malayan 
people as in hunting down and killing the Chinese. That required 
great mobility and the British used Sikorski S-55, in British 
service Whirlwind, helicopters to insert and extract its hunter 
teams and to move troops around a battlefield when larger numbers 
of communist fighters were located. Coupled with close support 
aircraft, the helicopters worked hard to move assets rapidly into 
the areas they were needed in and then moving them to the next 
point of need.

During the Korean War the US military began using helicopters in 
some numbers, although mainly for medivac to bring the wounded to 
MASH forward hospital facilities for stabilization before flying 
the casualties out to Japan or back the US for complete treatment 
and recovery. This saved a great many lives of UN Forces deployed 
to Korea and set the standard for all future conflicts, where the 
chances of survival for the sick and wounded dramatically increased.

The British had been very quick to start experimental operation of 
R4B helicopters from ships at sea and for SAR duties from ships 
and shore installations. This was almost entirely with Sikorski 
designs that were license-manufactured in Britain by Westland. 
The US Navy also made early use of helicopters at sea and for SAR 
but, unlike the British, the US used a much wider mix of 
helicopters, including multi-engine designs with greater lifting 
capacity.

Through the Cold War, the US continued as the leading manufacturer 
of helicopters with great diversity in size, capability and 
operating roles. By the disastrous involvement in the Vietnam War, 
the US was expanding its use of the helicopter as a standard 
transport for soldiers. This saw helicopters used as the major 
method of moving soldiers and supplies around the battlefield and 
the concept of fire bases surrounded much of the time by the enemy 
and supplied by helicopter. It also saw helicopters becoming 
ground attack aircraft with progressively more heavily armed and 
protected machines as gunships.

Today, the helicopter is a standard aircraft for a range of 
emergency services and for operation in battlefield areas. Much of 
this has been pioneered by US aircraft manufacturers and the US 
military. This book provides a great deal of detail, outstanding 
images and crisp narrative