Images of War, US Cold War Tanks and Armoured Fighting Vehicles, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

The Images of War series has proved very popular, setting the high standard maintained by this new addition to the series. The Cold War set the US Army a number of challenges, one of which was a virtually continuous high level of alert with a series of conventional conflicts and surrogate wars, but always under the shadow of the prospect of a nuclear battlefield. – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Images of War, US Cold War Tanks and Armoured Fighting Vehicles, Rare 
Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R3117
AUTHOR: Michael Green
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword 
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £16.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Cold War, armoured vehicles, tanks, personnel carriers, self-propelled 
artillery, assault guns, armoured cars, amphibious armour, M41 Bulldog, M551 
Sheridan, M3 Bradley Cavalry Fighting Vehicle, M113, Patton series tanks, M103 
Heavy Tank

ISBN: 1-52672-721-8

PAGES: 220
IMAGE: B3117.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/r3qlb2k 
DESCRIPTION: The Images of War series has proved very popular, setting the high 
standard maintained by this new addition to the series. The Cold War set the US 
Army a number of challenges, one of which was a virtually continuous high level 
of alert with a series of conventional conflicts and surrogate wars, but always 
under the shadow of the prospect of a nuclear battlefield. – Very Highly 
Recommended.

The US Army had to prepare for war against very large Soviet armoured forces 
across the plains of North Germany. It was always expected that a Soviet attempt to 
invade Western Europe would depend on a massive armoured force and require the 
use of tactical nuclear weapons in a conflict that might well escalate rapidly into a full 
nuclear exchange.

In terms of conventional warfare, the US needed urgently to introduce new vehicles 
to replace the types on which they had depended in WWII. This was a requirement 
not just of large numbers of modern armoured vehicles of all types, but a significant 
technical upgrade. The Patton series was the US Army answer to a new and effective 
Main Battle Tank, although technically it, and its initial main gun, was less effective 
than the superlative British Centurion MBT. Introduced just too late to see action in 
WWII, the Centurion achieved balance of in defence, manoeuvrability and firepower 
in a reliable package that made it an export success. The initial main gun was rapidly 
replaced with an outstanding 105mm gun that was also exported separately and was 
adopted by the US to up-gun US Army MBTs.

The 1950s saw the start of a race to produce better fire control systems and meet the 
requirement for all new armoured fighting vehicles to be able to operate closed up 
for extended periods on a nuclear battlefield. It ended up by producing a change in 
policies. During WWII, US industrial strength had been relied on to churn out a 
massive numerical advantage against Germany and to quickly replace all tanks 
destroyed by the Germans. The Grants and Shermans were adequate vehicles but 
technically inferior to the current German designs. They delivered land victory 
because they could kill German tanks or at least disable them, aided by the lack of 
reliability in the sophisticated later German designs. During the Cold War, the US 
and NATO attempted technical superiority while the Soviets concentrated on a small 
number of low cost vehicles in very large numbers that equipped USSR and satellite 
state armies. The use of tactical nuclear weapons in the NATO plan recognized that 
Soviet numbers could overwhelm NATO armour and also recognized that NATO had 
relatively small numbers of armoured vehicles in many different types, including 
obsolescent and obsolete armour from WWII.

The need to fight on a nuclear battlefield also demand a complete range of armoured 
fighting vehicles with the same radiation resistance as the MBTs. Open personnel 
carriers were replaced by closed vehicles and then given heavier defensive and 
suppressive armament. This book provides excellent coverage of these changes with 
rare images, many in full colour and accompanied by technical drawings.