Images of War, United States Army Armored Divisions of the Second World War, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

The Images of War series has proved very popular with its combination of aggressive pricing and outstanding rare images, as with this new addition there is also excellent concise text to provide a detailed picture of the subject. This new work provides a very nicely balanced view of US Army armored formations during WWII that is prefaced by a description of British and French innovation in WWI and US and other development between the two World Wars – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: Images of War, United States Army Armored Divisions of the Second 
World War, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2758
AUTHOR: Michael Green
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 217
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War I, World War 1, First World War, The Great War, 
WWII World War Two, World War 2, armour, USArmy, between wars development, 
armoured artillery, fighting tanks, reconnaissance tanks, armored cars, half tracks, 
engineer tanks, US perspective

ISBN: 1-52671-725-5

IMAGE: B2758.jpg
BUYNOW:  http://tinyurl.com/ycbbjfh6
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  The Images of War series has proved very popular with its 
combination of aggressive pricing and outstanding rare images, as with this 
new addition there is also excellent concise text to provide a detailed picture of 
the subject.  This new work provides a very nicely balanced view of US Army 
armored formations during WWII that is prefaced by a description of British 
and French innovation in WWI and US and other development between the two 
World Wars -  Most Highly Recommended

The author has been responsible for a number of books in this series, with a special 
interest in armoured vehicles, tactics and deployment. In this book he has covered 
the evolution of US Army armored vehicles and their deployment in WWII. By the 
entry of the US into WWII, the US Army had established mechanized divisions that 
comprised some soft skinned vehicles for supply and support and for communications 
and reconnaissance in addition to a range of armored vehicles, wheeled, half-tracked, 
and full tracked. Armored vehicles were developed to provide an all-arms force of 
self propelled artillery, engineering and assault vehicles, with gun tanks as armored 
fighting vehicles.

The author has started his story with the US Expeditionary Force that was sent to 
France in the closing stages of WWI. The American soldiers depended heavily on 
personal and fighting equipment from British and French supplies. This was logical 
because the Anglo-French forces had been fighting the Germans for four years in the 
first industrial war. Many weapons and defensive equipment were first used or 
developed for the war that was being fought and the equipment was proven under 
fire. At home, the US Army was being formed and its equipment was little changed 
from domestic duties.

In the case of armor, the US soldiers received the British heavy tanks that had been 
developed by the Royal Navy to break the deadlock of trench warfare. They were 
slow and ponderous but carried their armament in side sponsons that were similar to 
naval mounts for secondary or minor guns and were able to fire in both directions 
along enemy trenches as the tanks crossed them. They could also be used together 
in a relatively narrow arc of fire and individually over almost 180 degrees to port or 
starboard. The US force also received the Renault light tanks that were designed for 
reconnaissance as armored cavalry. These tanks carried their armament in a turret 
with a near 360 degree field of fire and were capable of a much higher speed, even 
across difficult terrain.

After the end of WWI it was logical that the US Army should continue with tanks of 
these types, while exploring alternative designs, including the innovative Christie 
suspension with its large tyred road wheels that could either run inside broad 
conventional tracks, or as a wheeled vehicle. There was also development of 
armoured cars and tanks with multiple gun mounts. What marked the US armor out 
from British and French post-1918 development was that it concentrated on half 
track and full track vehicles that could be produced in volume and where a chassis 
might be equipped in several forms to built an all-arms armoured force. None of the 
designs were outstanding but they were generally competent and, if produced in 
volume, could overwhelm smaller numbers of more sophisticated enemy armor. High 
loss rates could be sustained by volume production.

The author has provided very good descriptive text and captions to an excellent 
selection of rare images. The series of books is always applicable to serious 
enthusiasts and professionals in offering a visual augmentation of an existing military 
history library. They are also useful to novices who want to make an easy entry into 
an area of military history. This is also the case for this book, but it is more important 
in that it is a comprehensive study of the development of US armor into the armored 
divisions deployed in North Africa, Italy and Northern Europe with great success.