Images of War, The Vought F4U Corsair, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

The Images of War series has become one of the most popular series of military history with its fantastic selection of rare images, supported by concise text by leading authors. This series addition is particularly enjoyable, authored by one of the leading military history aviation authorities. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Images of War, The Vought F4U Corsair, Rare Photographs From Wartime 
Archives
FILE: R3145
AUTHOR: Martin W Bowman
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:  WWII, World War II, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, 
naval aviation, USN, USMC, shipboard operation, radial engine, heavy firepower, 
underwing ordinance, 'Winkle' Brown. FAA, Indo China, Korea

ISBN: 1-52670-588-5
PAGES: 121
IMAGE: B3145.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/se4o9o7
DESCRIPTION: The Images of War series has become one of the most popular series 
in military history with its fantastic selection of rare images, supported by concise text 
by leading authors. This series addition is particularly enjoyable, authored by one 
of the leading military history aviation authorities. – Most Highly Recommended.

In the opening stages of war for the US, following the Japanese pre-emptive attack on 
the US Pacific Fleet anchored in Pearly Harbour, the US naval aviators found the 
Japanese Zero an unpleasant surprise. The Zero had  limited firepower and little 
protection for its pilot, but it was highly manoeuvrable in dog fights, could carry a 
worthwhile bomb load for ground and ship attacks and had good range, essential in 
the expanse of the Pacific and the world of carrier task groups. USN Wildcat pilots 
began to get its measure by developing tactics which concentrated on Wildcat 
strengths and Zero weaknesses. This was welcome, but the real need was for fighters 
that could introduce many more advantages over the Zero and other Japanese combat 
aircraft. US aviation industry offered the Hellcat and the Corsair.

The Hellcat was a logical develop from the Wildcat by the same manufacturer, 
Grumman, and removed the weaknesses of the Wildcat while introducing new 
strengths. Naval aviators converted to the new aircraft with ease and rapidly began to 
change the balance of power in the Pacific air war. The Corsair introduced some 
dramatic improvements but also suffered some teething problems and rapidly 
developed a reputation as a 'widow maker' when pilots failed to master its 
performance and characteristics. This resulted in a reluctance by USN to employ it 
aboard ship and meant that its early operational days were concentrated on the USMC 
who found it an excellent and highly effective fighter and ground attack aircraft, 
operating it from island airstrips. Then the redoubtable 'Winkle' Brown of the Fleet 
Air Arm successfully took the Corsair aboard British carriers including the very much 
smaller escort carriers. He was also to make the first landings of the Sea Mosquito and 
the first generation jet fighters and deserves his place, unlikley ever to be equalled, in 
the Guiness Book of Records as the World's leading test pilot. His success encouraged 
a reappraisal of the Corsair as a USN carrier aircraft.

As always, the experienced author has created an enjoyable to read study, well 
researched and nicely written. There are many first rate images, as is to be expected 
of this series, but there is also a wealth of information in the text. The story is not 
confined to WWII, where it covers Corsair service with the USN, USMC, RN/FAA, 
RNZAF, but also its continuing service after WWII, French Indo-China and in Korea.