Images of War, The Royal Army Medical Corps in the Great War, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

Yet another excellent addition to a very popular series that presents outstanding images of war. Unfairly dubbed ‘Rob All My Comrades’ by soldiers in the trenches, the RAMC introduced a very professional field medical service that saved huge numbers of lives from battle injuries and epidemics during WWI – Very Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Images of War, The Royal Army Medical Corps in the Great War, 
Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2649
AUTHOR: Timothy McCracken
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  189
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War 1, World War I, First World War, Great War, 
1914-1918, triage, field hospitals, ambulance, stretcher bearers, 
pacifists, gas, shell shock, shrapnel, machine guns, carnage, trench 
warfare, sickness

ISBN: 1-47389-232-5

IMAGE: B2649.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y73xfmk4
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Yet another excellent addition to a very popular series 
that presents outstanding images of war. Unfairly dubbed 'Rob All My 
Comrades' by soldiers in the trenches, the RAMC introduced a very 
professional field medical service that saved huge numbers of lives 
from battle injuries and epidemics during WWI - Very Highly 
Recommended.

Florence Nightingale highlighted the woeful level of medical care for 
soldiers in a battle zone and made some important improvements in 
nursing, but the RAMC was to be the first really professional field 
medical service that came of age in the carnage of  the trench warfare 
of the Great War. Setting up field hospitals and dressing stations 
close to the front line, and making maximum use of railways and motor 
ambulances to bring in the sick and wounded was to save huge numbers 
of soldiers and also make those who could not be saved more 
comfortable in their final hours. After the end of the Great War, 
the RAMC successes in the field were to cause new problems because 
society was not ready for the large number of disabled veterans, 
particularly those suffering mental problems from the trauma of 
constant shelling and the daily horrors of trench warfare.

The RAMC was rewarded for its epic service to soldiers by being 
dubbed 'Rob All My Comrades' by those soldiers. There was a 
suspicion that stretcher bearers were more interested in robbing 
the dead than bringing back the wounded, even though every day saw 
immense bravery by stretcher bearers in braving the machine guns 
and artillery to crawl out into the mud of Flanders to bring back 
any wounded they could find. It was common for these brave men not 
only to go out into 'No Man's Land' unarmed and unprotected not 
just once but many times each day. What may have made soldiers 
think badly of RAMC personnel was that a number were 'conchies'. 
Today it may seem strange that someone who refused to carry arms 
but was prepared to brave enemy fire to rescue the wounded was 
regarded as a coward, but attitudes were different then. In the 
same way those who were pounded until they cracked and ran were 
rounded up and put before firing squads. At a time when school 
teachers try to avoid detail of war and teach 'empathy', spending 
a day in a muddy trench teaches very little about the living hell of 
WWI trench war. The lack of sound, the lack of constant shaking of 
the earth, the flying bullets, the attitudes to some of those facing 
the same terrors, and the brave young men who eventually broke under 
the relentless terror, are absent.

This book contains good concise text to ably present some moving 
and outstanding images of war.