Images of War, The Patton Tank Cold War Warrior, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

A new addition to the Images of War series, covering the Patton tanks of the Cold War. This is a fascinating book that reveals the development from the M47 to the M60 and the specialist support variants. Good text and outstanding images, a Must Read book.

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NAME: Images of War, The Patton Tank Cold War Warrior, Rare 
Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2442
AUTHOR:  Michael Green
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  207
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, Cold War, 
US Armour, M47, M48, M60, British 105mm gun
ISBN: 1-84884-761-1
IMAGE: B2442.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/j5a8rvj
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A new addition to the Images of War series, covering the 
Patton tanks of the Cold War. This is a fascinating book that reveals 
the development from the M47 to the M60 and the specialist support 
variants. Good text and outstanding images, a Must Read book. 

The US was not a leader in armoured technology and tactics, but it was 
good at producing generally competent fighting vehicles in very large 
numbers. Although the British developed very effective variants of the 
Sherman, including the Tiger-killer Sherman Firefly, and the specialist 
models for the Normandy Landings, the Sherman was rapidly known as the 
'Tommy cooker' because the Germans had little difficulty in setting it 
on fire. At the end of WWII, the US only had the Sherman and the 
Pershings as main battle tanks with which to oppose the Russia hordes 
of much more effective tanks. There was a reluctance to adopt the 
British Centurion which arrived too late for WWII but was rapidly 
acknowledged as a major advance in tank design. Although the Centurion 
sold in large numbers for export and formed a key tank in the Israeli 
armoured forces, the US decided to continue with the development of the 
less effective M46. In spite of its failings, this conversion of the 
Pershing entered service in some numbers.

Recognizing the deficiencies of the M46, the M47 development featured 
a 90mm main gun and new turret which was more effective against the 
Soviet threat but was still behind the British 105mm gun which had been 
developed for, and fitted to, the Centurion. However, the M47 was soon 
distributed mainly to NATO Allies and replaced by the M48 development.

Initially, over 12,000 gasoline-powered examples were brought into 
service. These were followed by the M48A3 which was taken to Vietnam by 
the US Army and the US Marines. By the late 1950s, the M60 appeared with 
the British 105mm main gun and the M48A5 went into service with the 
British 105mm main gun and diesel engines.

The missed opportunity was to go straight to the British Centurion with 
its 105mm gun and advanced fire control system, moving on in turn to the 
British Challenger tank with its 120mm gun, further improved fire control 
and advanced Chobham armour. Had the US negotiated a deal with Britain, 
NATO could have been rapidly equipped with a much more effective AFV than 
the opposing Russian tanks.

The author has provided a very informative narrative to accompany the 
photo-captions and a excellent selection of images. This covers the four 
variants of M46 thru M60, and the specialist engineer, recovery, bridging 
and anti-aircraft versions.