Images of War, The French Air Force In The First World War, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

An addition to the deservedly popular Images at War series. This new book covers the fascinating story of the French Air Force during WWI – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Images of War, The French Air Force In The First World War, 
Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2655
AUTHOR: Ian Sumner
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  156
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, Great War, First World War, World 
War 1, aviation, aerial warfare, airships, balloons, man-carrying 
kites, monoplanes, biplanes, fighters, fighter aces

ISBN: 1-52670-179-0

IMAGE: B2655.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y7w5vtkr
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: An addition to the deservedly popular Images at War 
series. This new book covers the fascinating story of the French 
Air Force during WWI - Highly Recommended.

The French aviation industry was a world leader in the early years 
of aviation and the newly created French Air Force served with 
distinction during WWI. It had taken a somewhat different path to 
that followed by the British and the Germans and was to be 
overtaken by these nations during the war, before falling further 
behind during the inter-war peace.

The images in this book, together with a well-written supporting 
text, shows some of the differences. Where the Germans had made 
significant advances in rigid airship design as part of its naval 
aviation, and Britain had also made great advances with its Royal 
Naval Air Service in the use of rigid and semi-rigid airships for 
naval convoy escort, and anti-submarine patrol, the French, who had 
been the early pioneers of dirigibles, placed a lower priority on 
airship development and deployment by the French Air Force. In part 
this may be due to the early lead established by French fixed wing 
heavier-than-air machines. Strangely, the French Air Force continued 
to make use of man-carrying kites, which had been discounted by the 
German and British Armies and by the Royal Navy after extensive naval 
trials from 1903 to 1908. The French also returned to service the 
spherical observation balloons of the previous century, which had a 
number of serious weaknesses, although these were progressively 
replaced by the more streamlined captive balloons of the type 
developed by the British and German Armies. In fixed wing aircraft, 
the French continued to develop leading edge machines, taking the 
first steps to using fixed forward firing machine guns on single 
seat fighter aircraft, firing through the propeller arc. 

The images in this book are, almost without exception, of the 
greatest clarity and definition, giving some indication of the 
extent of French photo library stock. Considering the conditions, 
under which many images were shot, processed and stored, books of 
this type often have to use a number of images that have suffered 
from the conditions of the time.