Images of War, The Battle for Arnhem 1944-1945, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

A new addition to the very popular Images of War series, covering the Battle for Arnhem. The attempt to drive a corridor through German lines in the Netherlands to shorten the war was a gamble that very nearly came off completely. – Highly Recommended

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Images of War, The Battle for Arnhem 1944-1945, Rare Photographs 
From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2856
AUTHOR: Anthony Tucker-Jones
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 125
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War 2, World War II, WWII, Second World War, Great Patriotic 
War, Western Front, German Army, Allied Armies, armoured vehicles, JEEP, air 
transportable vehicles, paratroops, glider troops, air support, Waffen SS, Operation 
Market Garden

ISBN: 1-52673-001-4

IMAGE: B2856.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y2yduur2
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A new addition to the very popular Images of War series, 
covering the Battle for Arnhem. The attempt to drive a corridor through 
German lines in the Netherlands to shorten the war was a gamble that very 
nearly came off completely. – Highly Recommended

The idea promoted by Montgomery was audacious and a gamble. Op Market 
Garden comprised two components, the British armour racing up a very narrow 
highway from one captured bridge to the next, and a large British, American and 
Polish airborne force dropped onto each bridge to hold it long enough for the 
armour to relieve them. Ultimately the armour failed to reach the final bridge at 
Arnhem in time to relive the British and Polish paratroops and glider troops.

The Battle for Arnhem has attracted much interest from historians, but this book 
breaks new ground and the text supports a first rate selection of rare photographs. 
It achieves this by providing a view of the US paratroops as they took and held 
against counter-attack by the German battle groups to allow the armour to progress 
towards Arnhem. The photographs provide a graphic and dramatic insight into all 
sides of what was a remarkable, if ill-fated operation.

Many historians have concentrated on the British paratroopers, in their heroic fight 
to cling on to the bridge they had taken at Arnhem, and spent much time in trying to 
lay blame for the failure to hold it. The Operation Market Garden plan did have its 
flaws, not least in underestimating the strength of German units along the route, but 
there were two separate challenges. The greatest challenge was in finding the 
numbers of aircraft and gliders to carry the airborne force to its drop and landing 
zones. The British and Polish forces at Arnhem suffered the greatest difficulties 
because there were insufficient aircraft to deliver them to target on the same day 
and the drop zones were much further from the bridge than they should have been. 
That meant that the troops had to move away towards the target, allowing drop 
zones to be overrun by the Germans. Consequently much of the ammunition and 
supplies dropped later were delivered to the Germans.

In general, at each bridge, the main challenge was for light infantry, lacking motor 
transport, adequate communications and supplies, to hold against the best armour 
in the German inventory. The US troops did have some bazooka anti-tank rockets, 
but the British and Poles only had PIAT spring fired mortar bombs to fight the tanks 
with.

The British armour had to fight very hard along a narrow highway that periodically 
halted the column, where support equipment, such as assault boats for a river 
crossing, were way down the column and facing great difficulty in coming past the 
vehicles ahead. Inevitably, the column was slowed to the point where the British 
airborne force at Arnhem was obliged to fight on significantly beyond the time 
allowed in the plans.