Images of War, M65 Atomic Cannon, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

A worthy addition to the extremely popular Images of War series from Pen & Sword. The author has delivered a beautifully researched and illustrated book covering the unique US Atomic Cannon, the apex of US heavy artillery development. – Very Highly Recommended

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NAME: Images of War, M65 Atomic Cannon, Rare Photographs From Wartime 
Archives
FILE: R2892
AUTHOR: David Doyle
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 232.
PRICE: £15.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Cold War, Soviet threat, Red Army, US Army, NATO, European 
Theatre, heavy ordnance, 280mm cannon, transportable heavy cannon, nuclear 
shells, tactical missiles, ballistic missiles

ISBN: 1-52674-360-4

IMAGE: B2892.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y4yqmpsv
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A worthy addition to the extremely popular Images of War series 
from Pen & Sword. The author has delivered a beautifully researched and 
illustrated book covering the unique US Atomic Cannon, the apex of US heavy 
artillery development.  –   Very Highly Recommended

The Allies faced a significant threat from the Soviets at the end of WWII. This 
developed into the Cold War, with some very hot surrogate wars. The US saw 
South Korea and Europe to be at direct risk from Communist aggression. The 
primary threat was from very large standing armies equipped with a huge 
superiority in tank numbers, poised on the borders and able to roll with little 
pre-warning. US and British intelligence considered this threat was inside the six 
week notice of hostilities, as a limited objective conventional war. It was anticipated 
that the Soviets and their associates could decide on a surprise invasion followed by 
a peace treaty that let them keep whatever territory they had occupied. It was also 
anticipated that the Soviet aggression could seize all of South Korea, and Europe to 
its North Sea and Atlantic Coasts. This was based on the subversion of newly 
liberated central European counties and the attempt to starve out West Berlin in 1948.

Part of the US response to this threat was the development of the 'Atomic Cannon', 
a 280mm gun that could fire conventional shells and nuclear shells over a range of 
up to 20 miles. This weapon was to become the pinnacle of US heavy artillery, 
produced in very small numbers and stationed in Germany and South Korea. The 
role of this cannon was seen as a nuclear shell delivery system to fill the gap until 
adequate numbers of tactical missiles became available. Its secondary role was as a 
deterrent and propaganda tool, popular at public demonstrations during the early 
years of the Cold War.

The challenge facing the designers was to produce the weapon in a form that it could 
be moved around. Historically, heavy long range guns had been designed as railway 
guns, either arriving on special carriages ready to load and fire, or as multiple loads 
to be assembled at a convenient firing position. The US Army decided on road 
transport, using a special push/pull/trailer assembly.

Once delivered to the firing position, the gun was unloaded, standing on jacking 
plates. It rapidly became obsolescent and then was completely replaced by missiles 
which were easier to deploy and could carry more powerful tactical warheads.

This is a story that has not been told well before, making this new book doubly 
welcome.