Images of War, Hitler’s Light Tanks, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

The very popular Images Of War Series is expanded by this well researched and presented review of the German light tanks which were the basis of the Panzers sent into Poland and continued to serve through to the end of WWII. The Germans expected more time to complete the re-equipment of the Panzers and had to make the most of what they had when they invaded Poland. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Images of War, Hitler's Light Tanks, Rare Photographs From Wartime 
Archives 
FILE: R3037
AUTHOR: Paul Thomas
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99                                                                
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, light tanks, 
armoured reconnaissance, armaments, performance, Blitz Krieg, Panzers, Pkw I, 
Pkw II, Pkw 39t, tank killers, assault tanks, self-propelled artillery, Europe, North 
Africa, Eastern Front

ISBN: 1-52674-166-0

IMAGE: B3037.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/s6lwblv

PAGES: 126
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The very popular Images Of War Series is expanded by this well 
researched and presented review of the German light tanks which were the basis of
the Panzers sent into Poland and continued to serve through to the end of WWII. The 
Germans expected more time to complete the re-equipment of the Panzers and 
had to make the most of what they had when they invaded Poland. – Most 
Highly Recommended.

The German Army was being equipped on the basis of a major war starting in 1944. 
When the British and French surprised Hitler by honouring their commitment to 
Poland, he was caught on the hop. He had expected to be able to continue nibbling 
away at his neighbours until 1944 when he thought Britain and France would no 
longer present a serious force against him. The German Army had managed very 
well in re-occupying the Rhineland, and absorbing Austria and Czechoslovakia. They 
did not expect Poland to present any serious challenge as the Red Army rolled in 
from the East to take roughly half of Poland under the agreement with Hitler.

When German troops attacked the Low Countries and France they performed to 
expectations even with less than adequate armour, training and command 
compensating in what was a stunning victory. Had they been able to invade Britain 
they would have been well ahead of the Nazi plan and able to direct almost all of 
their forces against the Soviet Union, which might well have succumbed. As history 
records, the good times ended at the Channel. Unable to invade Britain, and required 
to help the Italians out in North Africa and the Balkans, Hitler decided to ignore all 
military wisdom and open yet another front by invading Russia. The result was that 
the Panther and Tiger tanks arrived late in the battles in inadequate numbers and 
suffered a variety of reliability problems, with the Pkw III and Pkw IV battle tanks 
already passed their technical best. That required the light tanks to soldier on, to be 
adapted to mount heavier guns and fight in assault and artillery roles.

This new books provides a clear picture of the deployment of the light tanks with the 
star proving to be the Czech designed and built 38t rather than the German Pkw I and 
Pkw II light tanks that were intended as training and light reconnaissance vehicles 
but were also thrown into new roles because there was no alternative.