Images of War, Hitler’s Artillery 1939-1945, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

This is an important addition to a very popular series of books that feature lavish illustration with rare photographs. The German Army depended heavily on artillery, as did other contemporary armies. This new addition to the famous IoW series provides an excellent view of German artillery pieces of WWII and their accompanying troops and accessories. Outstanding rare photographs and concise text – Most Recommended.


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NAME: Images of War, Hitler's Artillery 1939-1945, Rare Photographs 
From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2500
AUTHOR: Hans Seidler
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 159
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Armour, tanks, tank warfare, horse-drawn,field guns, siege 
guns, anti-aircraft guns, infantry guns, gun tractors, half-tracks, 
WWII, World War Two. World War 2, Second World War

ISBN: 1-78346-377-5

IMAGE: B2500.jpg6
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/msdagsa
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This is an important addition to a very popular series 
of books that feature lavish illustration with rare photographs. The 
German Army depended heavily on artillery, as did other contemporary 
armies. This new addition to the famous IoW series provides an 
excellent view of German artillery pieces of WWII and their 
accompanying troops and accessories. Outstanding rare photographs 
and concise text - Most Recommended.

The Soviets described artillery as the God of War, but all armies of 
WWII depended heavily on artillery. It was however a period of great 
change. In 1939, whatever the myths of Blitzkrieg, the Germans 
depended heavily on horse-drawn artillery and also depended much on 
horses for haulage and as cavalry. Behind the fast moving armoured 
spearheads trudged the long familiar columns of infantry, horse-drawn 
artillery and horse drawn logistics. By the end of the war, the 
Germans still employed horses, but their armies were largely 
mechanized formations where tanks, armoured personnel carriers, 
self-propelled artillery and mechanized logistics were the norm. 
Rockets were also coming into common use, replacing many requirements 
previously met by the gun.

The author has concentrated on the artillery guns rather than 
including rocketry, but provided a comprehensive view of field 
pieces and heavier guns. The photographs are first rate and well-
captioned. In the process, the conditions faced by gunners are 
presented.