Images of War, Great War Fighter Aces 1916-1918, rare photographs from wartime archives

Another book in the very popular Images of War Series, this time looking at the ‘Aces’ of the Great War from 1916 to 1918. The usual outstanding selection of rare photographs is supported by concise and clear text in the form of captions and much longer introductory pieces. A very affordable volume with many remarkable images of war.


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NAME: Images of War, Great War Fighter Aces 1916-1918, rare 
photographs from wartime archives
FILE: R2483
AUTHOR: Norman Franks
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  123
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, World War 1, First World War, The Great 
War, aviation, fighter aircraft, aerial combat, aces, air war, 
biplanes, triplanes, monoplanes. RNAS, RFC, RAF, French Air Service, 
German Air Service

ISBN: 1-47386-126-8

IMAGE: B2483.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/lqy9hbq
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Another book in the very popular Images of War Series, 
this time looking at the 'Aces' of the Great War from 1916 to 1918. 
The usual outstanding selection of rare photographs is supported by 
concise and clear text in the form of captions and much longer 
introductory pieces. A very affordable volume with many remarkable 
images of war.

A picture may speak a thousand words and here is a fantastic selection 
of images that speak volumes. The standard of reproduction of the 
images is first rate. Crisp images that could have been shot this 
morning. The text is more extensive than in some volumes in this 
popular series, but it is still concise and full of insight.

The 'aces' of The Great War were truly pioneers in the very new 
activity of flying. The period covered in this volume is when fighter 
aircraft had really come of age. 

In 1914, the only service to fly aircraft that were truly integrated 
weapons systems was the Royal Naval Service Service. That was the 
result of the period from 1903 to 1911 when the Royal Navy approached 
aviation and flight as just another useful tool to help the Royal Navy 
maintain command at sea and meet the duties laid upon it. Initially 
the RN conducted extensive trials with man-carrying kites provided by 
Sam Cody. However, they were closely associated with Cody's work on 
his powered kite which was the first powered aircraft to make a fully 
controlled flight in Britain in 1908. The RN then worked with the 
Royal Aeronautical Society to establish the first military pilot 
school in 1911 and select the first class of aviators. The first 
naval aviators to graduate were given the task of identifying all of 
the roles that could be fulfilled at sea by aviation and what weapons 
systems should be designed and built. The result was that the RNAS was 
formed a few weeks before WWI broke out to give the RN full control of 
its air assets and an RNAS floatplane dropped the first torpedo from 
an aircraft. The British RFC and the French and German Air Services 
started the war with 'scouts' that were unarmed and intended only to 
scout for the armies, taking photographs and writing reports that were 
then flown back to base and dropped or handed over to the army 
commanders. Inevitably aircrew took a variety of weapons aloft and 
tried to damage or discourage enemy scouts, but it was not until 1916 
that the true fighter aircraft was in common service, frequently 
single seat and armed with one of more forward firing machine guns. 
There was still much experimentation, but the death toll now began to 
mount rapidly as aircraft increasingly made other aircraft their targets.

This volume looks at men and machines with an excellent selection of 
images to illustrate the progression of the 'ace' and the swings in 
fortune as one protagonist enjoyed a technical advantage before losing 
it to the enemy.