Images of War, German Armour Lost on the Eastern Front, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

This addition to the very popular Images of War series provides images of German tanks killed on the Eastern Front. The huge area of the Eastern Front made ideal country for massive tank battles and loses were equally enormous – Very Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Images of War, German Armour Lost on the Eastern Front, Rare 
Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2653
AUTHOR: Bob Carruthers
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  144
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Eastern 
Front, Soviet Army, German Army, tank warfare, tank battles, killed 
tanks, anti-tank, tank country

ISBN: 1-47386-844-0

IMAGE: B2653.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ydagqa57
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This addition to the very popular Images of War series 
provides images of German tanks killed on the Eastern Front. The 
huge area of the Eastern Front made ideal country for massive tank 
battles and loses were equally enormous - Very Highly Recommended.

The invasion of Russia initially seemed like another massive German 
victory for Blitz Krieg. In the early days the Germans swept forward 
with remarkably low losses and unbelievable success in destroying 
Soviet tanks and aircraft, taking enormous numbers of Soviet 
prisoners. In many respects, they were advancing through ideal 
tank country in a war of rapid movement. They were always in danger 
of outrunning their supply chain, but that seemed to be the only 
constraint.

The first winter came as a bitter shock to the Germans who had not 
adequately prepared for something that was so easy to plan for, 
after all, the example of Napoleon's retreat from Moscow was 
standard teaching in military colleges around the world and winter 
came ever year. 

Their vehicles did not respond well, with lubricants that froze and 
components that did not perform well in the low temperatures. The 
men suffered similarly, having no suitable clothing and suffering 
also from breakdowns in the supply chain. The Soviets however were 
much better prepared and their cruder equipment has broader 
tolerances that were a great advantage in extreme conditions. What 
also help the Red Army was a low regard for life. They were happy to 
accept very heavy casualties and expected their troops to survive on 
poor rations.

The result was that the Germans suffered increasing casualty rates 
and lost considerable numbers of tanks. The Soviets were soon 
deploying many more soldiers and their equipment was rapidly 
advancing, overtaking the capabilities of many German designs, 
notably, with the T-34 not only being a very competent design, but 
produced in very large numbers. This was similar to the Allied 
approach in the West, where US tanks were competent, often 
technically inferior to German models, but available in very large 
numbers with new production more than compensating for loses.

The images in this new book are outstanding, rare, and emotive. They 
show the vulnerabilities of German armour and chart the evolution of 
the tanks through the war on the Eastern Front. The Soviet loses 
were even more dramatic, but this was a war of attrition were the 
greater Soviet numbers would eventually triumph. Even so, the Red 
Army depended heavily on armour from Britain and the US, shipped to 
them at significant cost. Interestingly, The Soviets were very 
pleased with British Matilda infantry tanks and Bren Gun Carriers 
which served through to 1945, in spite of being regarded by the 
British as obsolescent in 1939. A most interesting photographic 
selection.