Images of War, Fallschirmjager: German Paratroopers 1942-1945, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

Another addition to the deservedly popular Images of War series. This is another IoW book covering the history of the Fallschirmjager, this time in taking their story from 1942 to 1945 – Highly Recommended

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NAME: Images of War, Fallschirmjager: German Paratroopers 1942-1945, Rare 
Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2932
AUTHOR: Francois Cochet
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 120
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, paratroopers, 
airborne forces, elite forces, light infantry, Italy, France, Eastern Front, Germany, 
light weapons, elan, Monte Casino, support weapons, specialist weapons, Luftwaffe

ISBN: 1-52674-070-2

IMAGE: B2932.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y3p5jjms
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Another addition to the deservedly popular Images of War series.
This is another IoW book covering the history of the Fallschirmjager, this time 
in taking their story from 1942 to 1945 –  Highly Recommended

The initial success of the Fallschirmjager in 1940 was to inspire the even more 
successful Allied airborne forces that played such an important role in the Allied 
amphibious landings from Operation Torch, through the Sicily/Italy landings, D-Day 
and the crossing of the Rhine. For the Germans, their paratroopers soon lost their 
air landing capabilities and became treated as shock troops. This was a logical 
conclusion to the invasion of Crete when the German airborne troops suffered a 
mauling and came close to defeat, in the face of determined British resistance.

The Germans continued to use gliders through to the end of the war, but as general 
cargo planes with or without engines added. The addition of engines was an attempt 
to produce cheap transport planes and to overcome the basic flaw of the assault 
glider in that once landed it would be unable to make a return flight. However, the 
halcyon days of the assault gliders and paratroopers in taking critical Belgian forts 
were over. This left them as light infantry to be used to shore up important positions. 
They continued to be required to undertake practice jumps and they retained their 
special weapons, such as the FG42 assault rifle that could be fired from an open or 
closed bolt, but they also began to use heavier weapons.

As long as airborne forces were required to parachute into drop zones, or use 
assault gliders, they were strictly limited in what weapons they could carry. This 
did not mean they were unfamiliar with artillery and armoured vehicles, or the 
tactics required to operate this heavy equipment. It just meant that their airborne 
role required them to depend on skill and light infantry weapons to take strategic 
points and hold their positions until relieved by ground troops with a full range of 
heavy weapons. As the war progressed, and Germany became ever more desperate, 
the Fallschirmjager  were required to man field guns and anti-tank guns, rocket 
batteries and armoured vehicles. During the Battle of the Bulge, Fallschirmjager 
were frequently carried on top of SS Panzer tanks in much the same way as the 
Red Army used its tanks to keep the infantry with the armour.

This book has clear and concise text as is now the standard for books in this series, 
in support of an impressive selection of rare images from wartime archives. An 
excellent introduction to the subject and a valuable addition to a serious enthusiast's 
library to support military history books that have few images.