Images Of War, Battle Of Midway, America’s Decisive Strike In The Pacific In WWII

The new Frontline Books series offers great images, concise insightful text, at a low price. The Battle of Midway was the start of the fight back that destroyed the Japanese navy and its aviation, ending in Japanese defeat. – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Images Of War, Battle Of Midway, America's Decisive Strike In The Pacific 
In WWII
FILE: R3045
AUTHOR: John Grehan
PUBLISHER: frontline books, Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99                                                                
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, 
Pacific Theatre, USN, USMC, Japanese, carrier fleets, carrier task groups, naval 
aviation, dive bombers, fighters, torpedo planes, carriers, escorts

ISBN: 1-52675-834-2

IMAGE: B3045.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/srsmagj
PAGES: 164
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The new Frontline Books series offers great images, concise 
insightful text, at a low price. The Battle of Midway was the start of the fight back 
that destroyed the Japanese navy and its aviation, ending in Japanese defeat. – 
Very Highly Recommended.

The US Navy and US Marine Corps started war with Japan at a disadvantage in 
aircraft. The Japanese Zero fighter was an agile, light, long range naval aircraft, 
superior to aircraft in US service. That continued to be true technically for the rest of 
the war. US naval aviation had concentrated on rugged aircraft with armour and .50 
calibre machine guns. The Wildcat was effective in the Atlantic because it was 
operating in an environment that demanded armour, heavy gun armament, with larger 
ammunition capacity. In the Pacific, US naval aviators had to learn to maximise on 
the attributes of their machines, concentrate on the Zero's weaknesses, and reduce the 
number of skilled Japanese naval aviators. The Battle of Midway proved the new 
approach to be effective.

After Midway the Hellcat and Corsair closed the performance gap on the Zero without 
sacrificing protection, ruggedness and gun power. These new aircraft also benefited 
greatly from the reduction of skilled Japanese pilots, with new replacements arriving 
at Japanese squadrons with limited flying hours. As with the Wildcat, the later aircraft 
were produced in greater numbers by a war production system far in advance of any 
Japanese capability.

At Midway, the battle was a triumph for US code breakers. The US carriers arrived 
without the Japanese realizing until it was too late. The Japanese code had been 
broken before the development of their attack on Midway and code breakers used this 
capability to advise the naval commanders of the Japanese plans. This resulted in 
casualties on Midway that had been planned for and which diverted Japanese attention 
away from the carriers. The US also managed to field a larger carrier force because of 
emergency work to repair battle damage, particularly to the Yorktown, and the 
allocation of a full complement of aircraft. These advantages were further 
strengthened by a reconnaissance screen of Catalina flying boats to spot the Japanese 
warships and report position, course and speed. That allowed the Americans to fly off 
their aircraft close to extreme range.

The slow torpedo bombers proved easy targets for the Zeros, but the dive bombers and 
fighter escorts succeeded in cutting through the defences and hitting Japanese carriers 
that had their decks full of aircraft being fuelled and rearmed. Many US aircraft were 
lost not to enemy action but to fuel running out before they could return to their 
carriers. The action of US submarines in rescuing downed pilots meant that losses 
were much less dramatic because US production could soon replace the lost aircraft. 
The Japanese however lost pilots and planes, with their carrier force being seriously 
depleted, losses which Japanese naval aviation was never to recover from.

The selection of images in this book is excellent, supported by clear action charts. 
There are very many illustrations, but there is also good text, well-searched and 
presented concisely to make this a must-buy book.