Images of War, Allied Tanks of the Second World War, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

A new addition to the very popular Images of War Series. This volume provides a graphic picture of the diversity and progress in designing, building and deploying tanks. As with other volumes in this series, its great strength is the quality and rarity of the images that illustrate to concise text, all at a very aggressive cover price – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Images of War, Allied Tanks of the Second World War, Rare 
Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2491
AUTHOR: Michael Green
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  208
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Eastern 
Front, Western Front, North Africa, tank battles, armoured fighting 
vehicles, AFV, technology, armour, blitz krieg

ISBN: 1-47386-676-6

IMAGE: B2491.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/kk44cfk
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A new addition to the very popular Images of War Series. 
This volume provides a graphic picture of the diversity and progress 
in designing, building and deploying tanks. As with other volumes in 
this series, its great strength is the quality and rarity of the 
images that illustrate to concise text, all at a very aggressive 
cover price – Highly Recommended.

In 1939, the tank was still a very new weapon and this was to be the 
first deployment of the tank as a dominant land forces weapon system. 
The introduction of the tank by the British in WWI had been spasmodic. 
Initially, it was available in small numbers and spread so thinly that 
it had more of a psychological impact than a practical influence. Of 
those small numbers of tanks that did arrive, many broke down very 
early on, depleting numbers further. The result was that the first 
tanks were slow moving shields for the infantry and had limited 
firepower on the move. As tanks began to arrive in France in larger 
numbers, they could be used as heavy cavalry to spearhead a frontal 
attack on enemy positions and then fan out behind the damaged enemy 
lines. However, there was little time to think of more creative and 
effective tactics for  what was still a largely unknown weapon.

After WWI, several military theorists in Britain, France and Germany 
began to consider ways of making the tanks the key element of an 
advancing army and to team it with aircraft to provide a powerful 
force that could move rapidly and bypass heavy enemy concentrations 
that could be surrounded and then dealt with by following forces while 
the tanks forged on. 

As a new weapon, the tank generated many creative designs, a number 
of which proved blind alleys. As WWII progressed, the designs began 
to converge into three main groups, to produce gun tanks, assault 
guns and self-propelled artillery. It also saw the first deployment 
of armoured vehicles that were intended to take on attack aircraft 
that were proving to be the most damaging weapons against the tank.

The Soviet tank is best known as the T-34, but the Soviets fielded a 
wide range of armour, some being the obsolete multi-turret designs, 
but also some highly functional assault guns and specialist armour. 
The Soviets combined innovative design with often crude production 
that saw some tanks rolling into battle straight from the factory 
without waiting to apply a coat of paint.

The Germans employed a solid and logical development program to 
produce ever more powerful and better armoured designs. They also 
include some very complex, and therefore intrinsically unreliable, 
technology that was impressive when it worked but soaked up 
development and production time. They also produced progressively 
heavier models that were too large and too heavy for some roads and 
bridges and required much larger transporter vehicles.

The British followed a similar approach to the Germans and this 
culminated in the impressive Centurion tank that was too late for 
WWII, but fought with distinction in a sequence of wars that 
followed. Fortunately, the downside of British complexity and 
innovation was offset by the availability of increasing numbers of 
US-built tanks that may not have been the finest designs available, 
but were competent and available in large numbers. The famous 
Sherman was often derided as the “Tommy Cooker”, because it was 
easily set on fire by German guns, but it was a battle-winning weapon 
and was up-gunned very successfully by the |British to enable it to 
kill the formidable German Tigers.

The fine selection of images and the clear text very effectively 
describe the design and deployment of Allied armour.