Ian Fleming’s Secret War, The Real-life Inspiration Behind the James Bond Novels

Ian Fleming was a character best known through the prism of his James Bond spy stories. Fleming was happy to encourage the myths that soon came to circulate around his best selling novels. The author provides a view from researching public records and private documents and its as fascinating as any account about James Bond – Highly Recommended.


 

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NAME: Ian Fleming's Secret War, The Real-life Inspiration Behind 
the James Bond Novels
FILE: R2521
AUTHOR: Craig Cabell
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  182
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War II, Second World War, 
intelligence, counter-intelligence, covert operations, psychological 
warfare, propaganda, tricks, spy's gadgets

ISBN: 1-47385-349-4

IMAGE: B2521jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/l64epn2
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Ian Fleming was a character best known through the prism 
of his James Bond spy stories. Fleming was happy to encourage the 
myths that soon came to circulate around his best selling novels. 
The author provides a view from researching public records and 
private documents and its as fascinating as any account about James 
Bond - Highly Recommended.

Ian Fleming was a controversial figure when he became famous as the 
creator of the James Bond stories, but he was also a very 
controversial figure during his service with Directorate Naval 
Intelligence during WWII. A signed photograph of Fleming in RN 
Commander's uniform was still hanging on the wall in one 
intelligence office in London as late as the 1980s and surrounded by 
some very interesting and competing stories.

DNI was really the start of modern professional intelligence services 
in Britain. When Naval intelligence was organised at the start of 
the 20th Century, it was formed to gain detailed knowledge of German 
armaments development, particularly in terms of naval guns and 
Zeppelin airships. It was more professional than some of the other 
fledgling intelligence operations that still employed amateurs not 
far different from those depicted in novels such as “The 39 Steps”. 
Part of the difference was that the Royal Navy rapidly saw the 
strengths and weaknesses of radio communication and was able to 
establish listening stations that could not only intercept radio 
signals from all over the world, but also locate the signal source 
by triangulation. That was responsible for starting a number of 
things that are now taken for granted as key elements of modern 
intelligence gathering and processing.

Traffic analysis began with DNI. There were operators noting down 
intercepted signals, details of where they were originating and 
where they were going to, and sending this to a central point to be 
analysed and the results passed to senior commanders. Initially much 
of that traffic was only encrypted in the form of International 
Morse Code, but soon the more cautious communicators were starting 
to use codes and cyphers to prevent eavesdroppers from knowing what w
as being said. This gave birth to Pattern Analysis and Threat 
Analysis and BCCS, the father of today's GCHQ and associate 
organizations.

When WWII was begun, the DNI capabilities were already formidable. 
When Churchill became Prime Minister he had a particular fondness 
for covert operations of all types and some of the very strange 
'toys' built for agents in the field. DNI Quartermasters were 
amongst the most prolific creators of these interesting and deadly 
devices and are commemorated by Fleming as his character 'Q' in the 
Bond stories. Fleming himself was 'Q' on occasion.

Fleming was not universally popular or respected by many of his 
colleagues. He was seen as a card playing gambler and playboy. He 
also worked with some very colourful and off-the-wall colleagues 
including Dennis Wheatley the best selling author and devotee of 
the occult. There was also a very professional, capable and serious 
side to Fleming. All of that has been mixed together by generations 
of Bond fans and pundits to create a series of myths that differ 
strongly from the reality. The author has painted a credible picture 
of Fleming and his contribution to the war effort. Its just as 
colourful, even if its authentic from written records.