How the Navy Won the War, The Real Instrument of Victory 1914-1918

This is an original approach to the factors leading to victory during WWI. It will cause some temperatures to rise but it is well researched and convincingly argued. A major addition to the pool of knowledge about the War-to-End-All-Wars – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: How the Navy Won the War, The Real Instrument of Victory 1914-1918
FILE: R2752
AUTHOR: Jim Ring
PUBLISHER: Seaforth Publishing, Pen & Sword 
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 232
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War I, World War 1, First World War, World War One, the 
Great War, naval warfare, blockade, siege, convoys, minefields, sea mines, naval 
aviation, strategic bombing, warships, tactics, technology

ISBN: 978-1-4738-9718-2

IMAGE: B2752.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yd7y37eu
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  This is an original approach to the factors leading to victory 
during WWI.  It will cause some temperatures to rise but it is well researched 
and convincingly argued. A major addition to the pool of knowledge about the 
War-to-End-All-Wars -  Most Highly Recommended

The steps to victory have been warmly argued by historians and military professionals. 
Much has been written about how Britain, or France, or the US won WWI. The 
arguments have revolved around the critical role of the Army or the Air Force. In the 
latter case, the RAF supporters have claimed victory for the RAF, ignoring the reality 
that it was formed in the final stage of WWI and actually blocked some war winning 
plans, particularly from the RNAS and the Royal Navy, and has failed to pay tribute to 
the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service. The RFC and the RNAS 
fought the air war from 1914 to the beginning of 1918 and introduced a host of i
nnovations to match the Germans. The crucial role of the Royal Navy has not  been 
recognized at all as the Instrument of Victory.

The balanced view should be that victory was achieved by a combination of 
contributions from each of the Allies and from each of their military services. 
However, sea power first prevented defeat and then weakened the enemy until final 
victory was achieved.

The author has produced a fine work that stands up for the Royal Navy and its 
significant role as the Instrument of Victory.

France on its own would have been defeated by the German attack through neutral 
countries. Fortunately the Germans met in the BEF an unexpected determination 
and brilliant rearguard action that killed the German hopes to swing rapidly round 
on Paris and a French surrender, duplicating on a convincing scale the Prussian 
attack on France that saw Paris besieged, forcing the French to agree terms. This 
British action was then built on brilliantly by an amazing level of co-ordination of 
French and British Generals to start throwing the Germans back to their frontier. 
Only the exhaustion of the tiny BEF gave the Germans time to dig in and begin a 
long war of attrition through trench warfare. When Russia collapsed the Germans 
were able to move their armies from that front to the Western Front. The arrival of 
US troops went a long way to redressing the balance on land. However, there could 
still have been a long period of stalemate and even German victory, had not the 
Royal Navy contributed the critical extra force to tip the balance to victory.

The Royal Navy made three vital contributions. 

Firstly, it protected Allied shipping on the long trade routes and in the narrow seas 
between the British Isles and mainland Europe. That prevented the Germans from 
being able to invade the British Isles and ensured that men and munitions could be 
poured across the Channel to keep the BEF and the French Armies fighting. Those 
critical supplies were only available because the Royal Navy was keeping the long 
sea routes open to bring in men and materials from the Empire and the US.

Secondly, the Royal Navy started WWI with real offensive aircraft. Weeks before
 the start of WWI the RN had won its political battle to regain total control of naval 
aviation  and celebrated by dropping the first torpedo from an aircraft. As early as 
1911, the first British naval aviators had considered how aircraft could be used to 
support traditional RN duties of protecting the British Isles and the trade routes to 
Empire. From that planning, the specifications were prepared to enable RNAS 
aircraft to drop bombs on enemy ships at sea and in port, launch torpedoes, drop 
depth bombs on submarines, attack Zeppelins and other German aircraft, carry out 
reconnaissance of enemy ships in port and at sea, assist RN warships in enforcing 
naval blockades, spot for naval guns, and provide communications facilities 
between naval air stations and ships at sea. That led naturally to the construction of 
aircraft carriers and the planning for carrier task force attacks on an enemy fleet in 
port.

The RNAS comprehensive plans for aircraft weapons and tactics, used trusted 
commercial contractors, the Army only saw aircraft as a new cavalry scout service 
with aircraft being designed and built by a Government Aircraft Factory that built 
what it though appropriate. In fairness to the Army this did not reflect on the 
creativity and courage of its own pilots, but on the dead hand of bureaucrats, turning 
out frail aircraft of very limited capability and far behind the technology being 
developed by the Admiralty through its successful operation with commercial 
contractors.

Thirdly, the Royal Navy maintained close blockade of enemy ports, that the German 
Navy failed to break, and took the war to German territory.

The blockade was maintained in the traditional manner with a screen of warships 
standing off the enemy coast, but it also included the sowing of vast minefields 
across possible escape and attack routes from German ports and the use of naval 
aviation not only to provide reconnaissance, but also to bomb German ports and 
strategically bomb the German Homeland.

The author has done a great job in advancing knowledge of the Royal Navy's critical 
part in WWI and his text is supported by an interesting photo-plate section.