Horrocks, The General Who Led From The Front

Of a handful of leading military commanders of WWII, Brian Horrocks stood out & was compared to Rommel. This is more than a biography of a major military figure, but a life lesson – Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Horrocks, The General Who Led From The Front
FILE: R2677
AUTHOR: Philip Warner
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  195
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, World War 2, North 
Africa, WWI, Op Market Garden, Europe, German surrender, Black Rod, 
TV presenter, general

ISBN: 1-52671-716-6

IMAGE: B2677.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yd5pfcqn
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Of a handful of leading military commanders of WWII, 
Brian Horrocks stood out & was compared to Rommel. This is more than 
a biography of a major military figure, but a life lesson – Most 
Highly Recommended.

Brian Horrocks describes his WWI entry into military action as 'a 
most undistinguished start' which is typical of a modest man who
 achieved greatness in his field. There are many types of commander, 
including the pounder who is happy to take high casualties, the 
cautious who misses opportunities, the timid who fails to exploit 
an advantage, and the charismatic leader who explains what will 
happen and leads from the front.

Brian Horrocks was certainly charismatic and led from the front. He 
was also highly regarded and followed into action by a group of 
soldiers from many nationalities that would do anything for a 
commander who inspired loyalty and confidence. Horrocks has been 
compared very favourably with Rommel and many of Montgomery's triumphs 
relied on Horrocks tireless drive and brilliance.

After a barnstorming performance in North Africa, Horrocks was 
seriously wounded and many thought his military career was over but 
he battled on with the same relentless courage and determination he 
had demonstrated in the field. Although not fully fit, he talked his 
way back into field command and led the Operation Market Garden to 
near total success. Had the British Airborne forces, who went into 
Arnheim, been better supported with communications equipment they would 
have held their bridge until Horrocks reached and relieved them. As it 
was they held on long past the expected period and Horrocks overcame 
considerable obstacles to reach them as they were forced to surrender 
or withdraw. General James Gavin commanding the 82nd (US) Airborne 
Division, which was part of Op Market Garden described Horrocks as “the 
finest general officer I met during the war”.

The qualities that saw Horrocks achieve so much in war continued into 
peace. He became Black Rod, an important ceremonial and administrative 
role in the British Parliamentary system, and discharged his duties in 
good humour and efficiency. Some believed he should have continued in 
the Army and achieved the highest rank, but he himself believed that he 
had reached his plateau as a fighting general, leading men into battle 
and not as a political soldier as Chief of Staff or Field Marshal.

He also reached a new and large audience. He was asked to present on 
television key parts of the war in Europe.  His presentations were a 
triumph because he demonstrated the talent that had made him such an 
effective field commander. He was able to set out all of the salient 
details of complex battles in a manner that would satisfy professional 
soldiers, but was also embracing and instructive for those viewers who 
had no military experience.

In history very few military commanders are as worthy and accomplished 
as Lt General Sir Brian Horrocks. The author has done a fine job of 
painting a faithful picture of the life and careers, including post war 
careers, of a thoroughly nice man who led by involving those under him 
in the objectives set them, encouraging and leading them to achievement.