Hitler’s Vineyards, How The French Winemakers Collaborated With The Nazis

A very sensitive area of WWII history that is told well and with sensitivity. The occupation of Europe by Nazi troops created many challenges and conflicts for the occupied population. – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Hitler's Vineyards, How The French Winemakers Collaborated With The 
Nazis
FILE: R3090
AUTHOR: Christophe Lucand
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War II, WWII, World War Two, World War 2, Second World War, 
Occupied Europe, collaborators, wine growing, vineyards, winemakers, France, 
industry, economy, reality

ISBN: 1-52676-071-6

PAGES: 224
IMAGE: B3090.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/ttpyrjc

DESCRIPTION: A very sensitive area of WWII history that is told well and with 
sensitivity. The occupation of Europe by Nazi troops created many challenges and 
conflicts for the occupied population. – Highly Recommended.

The Fall of France saw a large part of that country directly occupied and controlled by 
the Germans, with the Vichy Government controlling the remaining parts, but under 
strong German influence. Inevitably, the Germans took over the Vichy territories, 
giving them complete control. The result was that the French collaborated with the 
Germans, many with deep reluctance but some with great enthusiasm. Even the 
French Resistance had a complex history that included active collaboration with the 
German security services and the Holocaust programmes. This has created a very 
sensitive area that remains sensitive to this day.

We know that many French resisted in one way or another, including those working 
in factories and sabotaging products. To survive, everyone had to collaborate at some 
stage even if it was to enable them to continue to work actively against the Germans. 
We also know that there were French businessmen who eagerly collaborated, seeing 
that as a golden opportunity to enrich themselves. Internecine warfare within the 
resistance organizations saw Frenchmen betraying Frenchmen to the Germans as the 
groups often indulged in a civil war to provide their political group with advantages 
after the Germans had gone. There were also Frenchmen who actively assisted the 
Germans in betraying Jews who were shipped off to the extermination camps.

The author, an expert in vine and wine, has extensively researched, using official tax 
and financial archives. This has enabled him to pose the question of 'did the French 
winemakers collaborate?' and to provide the answers. The readable text is supported 
by a very interesting selection of images in a photo-plate section.

It is much easier after the end of a conflict to try attaching blame to individuals and
 industries, particularly if the people apportioning blame have not suffered occupation. 
In the end it comes down to degree. Identifying who enthusiastically collaborated, 
and who did so reluctantly, can be difficult. After the Germans were driven out many 
reluctant collaborators faced the wrath of their countrymen, while the most culpable 
carried on and became even richer and served in public office. The author has walked 
the line with sensitivity and provided a balanced review of this very painful time for 
French winemakers.