Hitler’s Hangmen, The Secret German Plot To Kill Churchill, December 1944

Fact can often be stranger than fiction and this new book uncovers the story of British Fascists plotting with German POWs to assassinate Churchill in 1944. The author uncovered the surprising and unknown facts of this attempt by the British Fascists to seize power, take revenge on Churchill and hand WWII victory to Hitler. – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Hitler's Hangmen, The Secret German Plot To Kill Churchill, December 1944
FILE: R3112
AUTHOR: Brian Lett
PUBLISHER: Greenhill Books
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £19.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, 
POW camps, prisoner discipline, SS, Nazi prisoners, Vehmic courts, British Fascists, 
Battle of the Bulge, POW escapees, Sir Oswald Mosley, Churchill, assassination

ISBN: 1-78383-117-0

PAGES: 236
IMAGE: B3112.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/rdr3mc6
DESCRIPTION: Fact can often be stranger than fiction and this new book uncovers 
the story of British Fascists plotting with German POWs to assassinate Churchill in 
1944. The author uncovered the surprising and unknown facts of this attempt by 
the British Fascists to seize power, take revenge on Churchill and hand WWII 
victory to Hitler. –  Very Highly Recommended.

This serious potential threat developed as embittered British Fascists were released 
from jail and attempted to collaborate with German POWs held in camps in the 
British Isles. The plot was uncovered largely by accident but how likely it was to 
have succeeded is debatable at that point in the war. It is a reminder that through 
history there have been Britons prepared to betray their country and continue to 
present a level of threat as has been demonstrated during the BREXIT process when 
elements of the Establishment tried to overturn the democratic vote of the British 
people. Even after a referendum and two General Elections, quislings in the Civil 
Service continued to plot against the people and the elected Government.

At any time, traitors can plot without being noticed and they are usually the same 
people, a mixture of the gullible, the thugs, the political extremists and the self-
important. The British Fascists were a national socialist Party that included many 
high placed individuals, led by a man who had been a rising star in the first Labour
 Government until he fell out with fellow fascists on the Marxist wing of the Labour 
Party and went off to form the British Union of Fascists Party. Sir Oswald Moseley 
was impressed by Mussolini rather than by Hitler who was emerging from 
Mussolini's shadow at the time that Mosley was establishing his new Party. One of 
Churchill's first acts on becoming the wartime Prime Minister was to jail key 
members of the British Fascists, including Sir Oswald Mosley. It is clear that MI5 
already had a very thick file on the membership of Mosley's Party and probably had a 
number of undercover agents embedded in it. For that reason, it is possible that 
discovery of the 1944 plot was not accidental and may even have been used by MI5 
as part of the preparations for life after the war.

In terms of whether the plot could have succeeded, Britain still had large numbers of 
US troops in country and, had Churchill been incapacitated by enemy action, treason 
or bad health, it is very likely that the Government would have survived under new 
leadership. The plot was related to Hitler's unrealistic hopes for his last throw 
Ardennes Offensive and may have suffered from his increasingly delusional 
behaviour. The Ardennes Offensive may have seen large numbers of the best German 
troops assembling without the Allies having detected them and were equipped with 
the best equipment available, but this strike was always potentially a very vulnerable 
situation for the Germans. It was stopped primarily because the weather cleared and 
the Germans started with insufficient fuel. The recovery and fierce defence mounted 
by US troops was also a strongly influential factor keeping the Germans away from 
the Allied fuel dumps they needed to plunder to continue their operation. With the 
clearing weather, always the most probable condition, allied air power swept in with 
rocket firing ground attack aircraft and bombers making mincemeat of those German 
vehicles still with enough fuel to be mobile.

The POW situation is potentially much more debatable. Britain had followed a policy 
of moving POWs on to camps in North America, partly to avoid the need to dedicate 
more troops to guard duty and partly because it reduced the demand on supplies that 
had to be brought in by merchant convoys. For those prisoners, some hundreds of 
thousands in 1944, retained in camps in the British Isles, the guards were often drawn 
from the Free Forces in Britain, particularly Poles and the prisoners were allowed to 
establish their own management system run by SS and Nazi Partie members held in 
the camps. They were allowed to run their own courts and award punishments 
including execution by hanging. Whether this was a wise policy is open to debate but 
it has to be remembered that prisoners did not make home runs, as British prisoners in 
German camps regularly managed, and the manpower tied up in guarding German 
prisoners was remarkably light but successful.

The author has undertaken extensive research and argues his points well. The modest 
photo-plate section is informative and includes full colour images. That this story was 
not covered better at the time or immediately after the war may seem a mystery but it 
has to be remembered that 1944-1946 it was a murky area of war history and the 
change from war to peace politics almost revolutionary. In this period the British 
coalition Government had agreed with Stalin to send back any Russian or Ukrainian 
POWs who had been caught serving the Germans, even though it was appreciated 
that they were likely to receive very harsh treatment. The incoming post-war Atlee 
Labour Government saw itself as a national socialist regime co-operating closely 
with the Soviet national socialist regime under Stalin, to the point where they were 
happy to send to Stalin examples of the most advanced military equipment developed 
in Britain during WWII. Mosley could no longer be restrained in the way that 
Churchill had done during the war and neither the Conservatives nor Labour wanted 
to give him any political oxygen.