Hitler’s Forgotten Flotillas, Kriegsmarine Security Forces

The minor warships in any navy play a very important part in naval warfare but often receive very little attention from historians. This new book provides a detailed view of the Kreigsmarine Security Forces in WWII with many previously unpublished images. It is an important addition to the pool of knowledge and the first substantial review of German naval security forces – Very Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Hitler's Forgotten Flotillas, Kriegsmarine Security Forces
FILE: R2532
AUTHOR: Lawrence Paterson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  352
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, World War 2, Second World War, 
auxiliary warships, minesweepers, patrol boats, fast patrol boats, 
riverine craft

ISBN: 978-1-4738-8239-3

IMAGE: B2532.jpg6
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/l26wwke
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The minor warships in any navy play a very important 
part in naval warfare but often receive very little attention from 
historians. This new book provides a detailed view of the 
Kreigsmarine Security Forces in WWII with many previously unpublished 
images. It is an important addition to the pool of knowledge and the 
first substantial review of German naval security forces – Very 
Highly Recommended.

The British and Germans both built up large fleets of minor warships 
for coastal and riverine operations. These workhorses may not have 
been the most glamorous warships, but they fulfilled a vital role. 
They swept mines and discouraged submarines, provided anti-aircraft 
cover for small convoys, provided guard boats, and policing of 
borders and rivers. Both navies used vessels of similar origins, 
fishing boats, small steamers and cargo boats, motor boats and older 
warships. They carried similar armaments and were crewed in a similar 
way. 


Typically, a fishing boat would be impressed as an auxiliary warship, 
to be armed with a small deck gun, 3 or 6 pounder, perhaps a 20mm 
canon, and a few machine guns. In place of fishing nets the vessel 
might be given a para-vane to be towed as a mine cutter, and anti-
submarine capability was added by fitting rails for depth charges, 
or simply adding some depth charges that could be pushed overboard. 
Some of the larger or more modern vessels might be equipped with 
radar and/or a sonar system. The crew might be former fishermen with 
the addition of a naval gunner. A very similar approach was taken 
with larger ships impressed into service.

Harbour defences required vessels to move anti-submarine booms and 
provide standing patrols against submarines and frogmen. Although 
many auxiliary warships were commercial vessels taken into service, 
coastal security patrols required more vessels than could be 
acquired in this way. Some of the void was filled by taking yachts 
and other leisure vessels into service but, in the main, the deficit 
was filled with new patrol vessels built specially for the purpose. 
These new vessels were often built from non-strategic materials in 
small boatyards that were unsuitable for the repair or construction 
of larger warships. Unsurprisingly, there was much similarity 
between British and German designs.

The author has clearly undertaken exhaustive research and assembled 
a vast amount of information on the German Naval Security Fleet, 
Sicherungsstreitkrafte, producing what is a unique review in depth. 
The main body of the book provides clear text with embedded images 
in illustration. There are a great many images and many have not 
been published before. Although British Coastal Forces have 
received less than their due in print, the German Navy has fared 
even worse and this book is a very welcome correction of this 
deficiency. To a comprehensive review has been added an equally 
comprehensive set of appendices, bibliography and index.